amyloplast


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Related to amyloplast: Elaioplast

amyloplast

(ăm`əlōplăst'), also called leucoplast, a nonpigmented organelle, or plastid, occurring in the cytoplasm of plant cells. Amyloplasts transform glucose, a simple sugar, into starch through the process of polymerization, and store starch grains within their stretched membranes. Especially large numbers occur in subterranean storage tissues of some plants, such as the common potato.

amyloplast

[′am·ə·lō‚plast]
(botany)
A colorless cell plastid packed with starch grains and occurring in cells of plant storage tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
1996; Lariguet and Fankhauser, 2004), where phytochrome is found to promote the conversion of amyloplasts to other forms of plastids in the endodermis, causing cessation of hypocotyl gravitropism (Kim et al.
There is an exception concerning amyloplast formation during the bicellular stage of some grasses, such as Sorghum bicolor, in which the plastids next to the tapetum accumulate starch before those that are far from the tapetum do (Christensen & Homer, 1974).
The vegetative cell cytoplasm is very dense, filled with numerous small vesicles, mitochondria, lipidic globules, amyloplasts and ERr with extended cisternae.
Arena starch grains have numerous small and distinctive pressure facets due to the grains packing together very tightly in the amyloplasts during their formation (Figure 5).
If polarized light microscopy is included, it can be used as a tool to identify plant material on the basis of the Maltese cross evident in amyloplasts when viewed with crossed polars and the birefringence exhibited by cellulosic fibers (for complete instructions for a lab on polarized light microscopy, see McMahon, 2004).
Proteomic characterization of wheat amyloplasts using identification of proteins by tandem mass spectrometry.
In addition to working as photoassimilate repositories, soybean cotyledons become green and expand, suggesting that their amyloplasts are transformed into chloroplasts.