anchor ball

anchor ball

[′aŋ·kər ‚bȯl]
(naval architecture)
A projectile with grappling hooks which is fired into the rigging of a wrecked vessel for lifesaving purposes.
A black, circular shape hoisted between the bow and foremast of a vessel to indicate that it is anchored in or near a channel.
References in periodicals archive ?
The deck has been kept clean; mooring cleats are Yachting Development's pop up style cleats; the anchor windlass is tucked away underneath a hatch on the foredeck, and the anchor itself is a submarine style anchor that drops out from the underside of the hull so there is no visible sign that the yacht is at anchor except for the anchor ball in the fore triangle.
Well, this is why: Pulling the anchor is no joke in the dark, especially with the anchor ball.
With the anchor ball you've got your ball ring that you run underneath, and some people just clip it under, but I'll just twist the clasps of the clip to give a much more reinforced connection on the line.
When anchoring at a bridge or near a dock, use a quick-release anchor ball so that you can get underway to get a big fish away from the structure (and the anchor line) quickly.
An anchor ball is a good idea in this situation because tarpon often take off through the bridge pilings and need to be chased.
You will also find anchor balls here both inside and outside the SPA.