anchorage-dependent cell

anchorage-dependent cell

[¦aŋ·kə‚rij di¦pen·dənt ′sel]
(cell and molecular biology)
A cell that grows, survives, or maintains function only when attached to an inert surface, such as glass or plastic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Intracellular reactive oxygen species activate Src tyrosine kinase during cell adhesion and anchorage-dependent cell growth.
Microcarrier culture introduces new possibilities allows practical high-yield culture of anchorage-dependent cell.
The cytodex, which not only provide possibilities for anchorage-dependent cells but also for cells growing suspension, can be used in homogeneous spinner bioreactors.
Serum-free media (SFM) was first used in mammalian cell culture by Ham in 1965; much of the early work involved anchorage-dependent cell lines.
For the purposes of cell encapsulation, ECM analogues provide the framework necessary to promote anchorage-dependent cell adhesion and growth and to prevent excess aggregation and consequent necrotic core formation.
Being similar to the major inorganic component of natural bone, the inorganic compound such as hydroxyapatite (HAp) or a calcium phosphate in a composite scaffold provides good osteoconductivity while the polymer provides the continuous structure and design flexibility to achieve the high porosity and high surface area, which are necessary for anchorage-dependent cells such as osteoblasts to survive and differentiate [1].
Studies show that anchorage-dependent cells growing on ECM undergo more efficient plating and have higher proliferation rates.
In the absence of the FAK signal, anchorage-dependent cells are programmed to undergo apoptosis as a default pathway.