anchorite

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anchorite

a person who lives in seclusion, esp a religious recluse; hermit

anchorite

[′aŋ·kə‚rīt]
(petrology)
A variety of diorite having nodules of mafic minerals and veins of felsic minerals.
References in periodicals archive ?
While it is generally accepted currently that Julian was not the original name of this anchoress but rather that she took the name of the Church to which she was attached, E.
If the life of an anchoress is beginning to sound rather cushy, bear in mind the lady in question was effectively incarcerated for the rest of her life.
Eleanor explains: "I'm not a historian but I believe that an anchorite or anchoress would be attached to a cathedral and had a room where they prayed.
19 F Showing of Chris Newby's Anchoress (1993) (108 mins.
Contrary to the careful, well-argued connections made between literary writing and theology, as well as to the clear echoes found in the writers' withdrawal from postmodern consumer society to the anchoress status of Julian of Norwich, the discussions about women's contributions seem to me a bit pedestrian.
An anchorite (male) or anchoress (female) withdrew from the world for religious reasons, to live locked in a solitary room next to a church in order to pray and be close to God.
40) Elisabeth was never enclosed as an anchoress, so it is most likely that the room and chapel were built to house her performances and the growing number of spectators.
The books and reading material of the Norwich Anchoress Katherine Manne and Elisabeth Throckmorton, Abbess of Denny (chapter five), bespeak the participation of women in the dynamic and potentially dangerous intellectual milieu prior to the break with Rome.
In medieval England too they were not uncommon, and the cell of the anchoress St Julian of Norwich can still be seen at St Michael's church.
41 contains texts written for a woman religious, possibly an anchoress.
We read how Margery sought confirmation from the anchoress that her "hysterical" experiences were not "crazy" but were indeed blessed, and in Margery's account we hear the anchorite's own voice.
There sat Kara, a wispy little mystic, a kind of anchoress of the fourth grade who would have given Hildegard of Bingen a run for her money.