anchorite

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anchorite

a person who lives in seclusion, esp a religious recluse; hermit

anchorite

[′aŋ·kə‚rīt]
(petrology)
A variety of diorite having nodules of mafic minerals and veins of felsic minerals.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Vita Sanctae Marie provides an extended description of Mary's relations with her fenestral lover, including her choice to climb out the window of her anchoritic cell to have sex with the young man after he importunes her "ita ut unius anni circulus volveretur, donec cogitationem ejus verborum suorum mollitiae enervaret" (and for the full circle of a year, he softened her thoughts by his words).
The scene's focus on her anchoritic immurement, physical defilement, and enforced asceticism--penance directed, as Abraham emphasizes, "iuxta meum velle" (entirely according to my will) (75)--casts a shadow over Abraham's and Effrem's closing celebration of their literal containment of sin.
Her subsequent choice to immure herself serves as an interesting example of the collocation of incest and anchoritic immurement contemporary with Hrotsvit of Gandersheim's dramatic reworking of the Lapsus et Converso Marie (Vita Sanctae Marie).
In part I, on the influence of anchoritic spirituality upon later lay piety, Bella Millett writes on Ancrene Wisse and the Book of Hours.
7) Anchoritic rules emphasized spiritual solitude rather than physical isolation, and they required rather than prohibited contact with those clergy, visitors, and servants who kept the anchorite spiritually and physically well.
12) Ancrene Wisse also reflects a relationship between its author and these anchoresses which was clearly more than rhetorical: while the hortatory pose was common enough in anchoritic rules,(13) the author of Ancrene Wisse clearly knew the anchoresses prior to their enclosure (`Ant 3e mine leoue sustren habbep moni dei icrauet on me after riwle' (fol.
This is fundamentally true of the rule's content: in its constant and keen awareness of the dangers of the world's entanglements, we could describe Ancrene Wisse as extraordinarily `pragmatic in its approach to spiritual reality' precisely because it provided anchoritic women with the means to defend themselves against such dangers.
We can see the shape of Ancrene Wisse most clearly, and, thus, better observe its surprising structural attributes, if we first consider other formal possibilities for a guide to the anchoritic life.
30) The De institutione moves from a description of how the anchoritic person should occupy her small part of the world to a description of how she should occupy that part of the world contained within (as it is created by) her thoughts.
Moreover, since the anchoritic life is bodily in this generally Christian sense -- since the incarnation was itself the mode by which God made himself similar to all human selves -- the anchoress in the anchorhold is the image of every Christian.
By tracing the course of these particular bodily understandings, then, Ancrene Wisse itself shows that the anchoritic life cannot succeed in its attempt to separate the self from the world precisely because the anchoress is an enclosure.
The volume opens with an introduction by conference organizer Diane Watt and contains essays by Jane Cartwright, `The desire to corrupt: convent and community in medieval Wales'; Marie-Luise Ehrenschwendtner, `Puellae litteratae: the use of the vernacular in the Dominican convents of southern Germany'; Rosalynn Voaden, `All girls together: community, gender and vision at Helfta'; Penelope Galloway, `"Discreet and devout maidens": women's involvement in beguine communities in northern France, 1200-1500'; Susannah Mary Chewning, `Mysticism and the anchoritic community: "a time .