ancient

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Related to ancientness: Ancientry

ancient

1. of the far past, esp before the collapse of the Western Roman Empire (476 ad)
2. Law having existed since before the time of legal memory
3. a member of a civilized nation in the ancient world, esp a Greek, Roman, or Hebrew
4. one of the classical authors of Greek or Roman antiquity
References in periodicals archive ?
Exhibited i n an ancient space, these large metal forms ended up sharing with the Roman brick and marble an idea of ancientness that transcends real time and even the physicality and weight of the work's constituent elements.
Now he lies quiet "in the heart of the country, slowly sinking into the ancientness of it, making it mine, grain by grain, blending my white grains with its many black ones" (130).
I had arrived at some deep, palpable ancientness, the womb of the world, where virtually everything was and will be created.
There's areas of the Welsh countryside that are reminiscent of New Zealand, especially in the South Island of New Zealand that look like Wales with the hills and coastline, there's an ancientness about the countryside there that is a bit more raw here.
Equally, while the sense of ancientness is perhaps an aspect of every empire's claim to legitimacy, the balance between past and present shifts when decline sets in.
For example, France's history has been neatly encapsulated by Tony Judt, who stresses "the sheer ancientness and unbroken continuity of France and the French state .
Ancientness of family did play a role in a few relatively insignificant cases, but on the whole robe and sword, or old and new, as fundamental distinctions simply did not exist.
In the midst of legal precedents, he also invokes the biblical son of Noah and the mythological centaur Nessus (whose bloody tunic adhered to Hercules, setting his skin on fire and killing him) to demonstrate the ancientness and permanence of blackness (set in contrast to the purity of legislation).
He has earned his vision of transcendent unity by becoming literally one with the land, part of what is now always meant by "Australia": "And me all that while lying quiet in the heart of the country, slowly sinking into the ancientness of it, making it mine, grain by grain blending my white grains with its many black ones" (130).
And, however fascinating it may be to debate the claims to primacy of Oxford and Bologna (both eclipsed in ancientness, of course, by Al-Ahzar, Nalanda, and Taxila), looking for a point of historical origin tends likewise to obscure the sense of urgency that should attend any statement of a university's role, particularly at a time when--at least in Britain--it is under such threat.