anecdote

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anecdote

(ăn`ĭkdōt'), brief narrative of a particular incident. An anecdote differs from a short storyshort story,
brief prose fiction. The term covers a wide variety of narratives—from stories in which the main focus is on the course of events to studies of character, from the "short short" story to extended and complex narratives such as Thomas Mann's Death in Venice.
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 in that it is unified in time and space, is uncomplicated, and deals with a single episode. The literal Greek meaning of the word is "not published," and it still retains some such sense of confidentiality. Sometimes an anecdote is inserted into a novel as an interval in the main plot, as in Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy. Famous books of anecdotes include the Deipnosophistae of Athenaeus and Plutarch's Lives.

Anecdote

 

a brief story about some insignificant but characteristic event drawn from the life of a historical personage. In modern word usage (from the middle of the 19th century) an anecdote also refers to a short, oral, humorous story with an unexpected and witty ending.

In the first sense of the term, “anecdote” was used in conjunction with the satirical Secret History by Procopius of Caesarea. Later the term “anecdote” began to be applied to minor narrative genres of a comic nature, often with a sharp political content. In West European literature, for instance, the fabliau and the facetiae developed especially during the Renaissance—for example, Poggio Bracciolini’s Facetiae. In Russia the anecdote first became widespread in the second half of the 18th century (the collections of N. Kurganov, P. Semenov, and others). The anecdote has become widespread in modern urban folklore.

REFERENCE

Maslova, E. “K istorii anekdoticheskoi literatury XVIII v.” In Sbornik statei ν chest’ akademika A. 1. Sobolevskogo. (Sb. otd. rus. iaz. i slovesnosti AN SSSR, vol. 101, no. 3.) Leningrad, 1928.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both the disintegrationist Taylor (168) and the self-revisionist Vincent (392) notice that Sir William Lucy of Charlecote, thrice Sheriff of Warwickshire in the reign of Henry VI, was ancestor to the Sir Thomas Lucy of Charlecote, gentleman and sheriff of Warwickshire in the time of Shakespeare, alleged by Nicholas Rowe and other anecdotalists to have arrested Shakespeare for poaching deer in his park.
The inclusion of Howard Shore's urgent score to The Silence of the Lambs, however, would have certainly pleased anecdotalists.
Hotcher and his fellow anecdotalists aren't bothered by the steep prices, generally mediocre food (stick to the veal chop) and aggressively cost-conscious service (expect a personal visit from the proprietor if she feels you're not consuming enough to justify the space you're occupying).