aneroid


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Related to aneroid: aneroid barometer, aneroid manometer

aneroid

[′an·ə‚rȯid]
(engineering)
Containing no liquid or using no liquid.

aneroid

aneroid
A thin, disc-shaped box or capsule, usually metallic, partially evacuated of air and sealed, which expands and contracts with changes in atmospheric or gaseous pressure. The aneroid is the sensing and actuating element in various meters or gages, such as barometers, altimeters, and manifold-pressure gages. It is also the triggering or operating element in various automatic mechanisms. A device similar to an aneroid but open to outside pressures, such as the capsule in an air-speed indicator, is not commonly called an aneroid.
References in periodicals archive ?
E Coleman reached Athabasca Pass in 1893, the elevations of Athabasca Pass and Mount Brown were measured using an aneroid barometer and boiling point thermometer.
From here, Aneroid Mountain looms from a wall of stripey red-brown cliffs on the horizon.
Then there were, and are, round aneroids, banjo round aneroids, pocket aneroids, altimeters and desk barometers.
Their website boasts of "an incredible variety of weather predictors, from conventional mercury and aneroid barometers.
Whether the equipment is aneroid, mercury, or electronic, it should be regularly inspected and validated.
Hazlitt adds that this application is rather unique for bellows, "We've seen bellows used for aneroid functions, pressure compensation, seals, flexible couplings and self-locating electronic connectors, but this is one of the few as a mechanical manipulator.
In coastal Queensland Jack used Admiralty Charts, filling in the land areas with dead reckoning, star sights, bearings to coastal headlands, and aneroid barometer altitude readings.
DuraShock[TM] Integrated Aneroid Sphygmomanometer--Shock-Resistant Blood Pressure Monitor
Aneroid devices provide a high degree of accuracy when supported by a regular maintenance program.
New devices use diodes and other current technology to supplant the century-old standard mercury and aneroid sphygmomanometers, while retaining the auscultatory technique.
The simplest and least expensive device--an aneroid sphygmomanometer--consists of a blood pressure cuff connected by a rubber tube to a dial that registers pressure.
Measurements should be taken preferably with a mercury sphygmomanometer, a calibrated aneroid manometer, or a validated electronic device.