angioplasty

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Related to angioplasties: balloon angioplasty

angioplasty

(ăn`jēōplăs'tē), any surgical repair of a blood vessel, especially balloon angioplasty or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, a treatment of coronary artery diseasecoronary artery disease,
condition that results when the coronary arteries are narrowed or occluded, most commonly by atherosclerotic deposits of fibrous and fatty tissue. Coronary artery disease is the most common underlying cause of cardiovascular disability and death.
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. In balloon angioplasty a balloon-tipped catheter is inserted through the skin into a blood vessel and maneuvered to the clogged portion of the artery. There it is threaded into the blockage and inflated, compressing the plaque against the arterial walls. Frequent postoperative reclogging (restenosis) of the treated area has led to the use of alternative techniques such as laser angioplasty, which employs a laser to burn away or vaporize the plaque, and to the study of various drugs, gene therapies, and mechanical devices such as a stainless steel coil, or stent (most often now coated with a drug that inhibits restenosis), designed to hold the plaque back.

angioplasty

[′an·jē·ə‚plas·tē]
(medicine)
A procedure for alleviating blockage of an artery in which a balloon-tipped catheter is threaded into an artery to a point of obstruction and inflated to push the vessel open.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vice President Cheney, comedian Drew Carey, playwright Edward Albee, and talk show host Larry King all had coronary angioplasties.
Timothy Gardner, chief of cardiothoracic surgery at the University of Pennsylvania, said the study underemphasizes the need for repeat angioplasties on some patients.
What's more, adds Peter Kwiterovich of Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, "about 30 to 40 percent of all angioplasties block up again within six months or so.
For the study, researchers systematically searched papers about angioplasties performed at centers with and without on-site surgery; the papers were published between 1990 and 2010 in several medical databases.
Nearly 30 percent of all angioplasties may be performed in patients who are at high risk for ischemic complications.
Statistics show 1 or 2 in 500 elective angioplasties develop complications that sometimes require immediate open heart surgery to correct.
A clot-blocking drug may allow doctors to perform angioplasties with greater success, a study found.
Approximately 400,000 balloon angioplasties were performed in the United States in 1993, and restenosis occurs in about 40 percent.