Anger

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Anger

Allecto
one of the three Furies, vengeful deities who punish evil-doers. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 274]
Almeira
scorned woman like whom “hell hath no fury.” [Br. Drama: The Mourning Bride]
Belinda
furious over loss of lock of hair. [Br. Lit.: Rape of the Lock]
Bernardo
enraged that member of a rival street-gang is making advances to his sister. [Am. Musical: West Side Story]
Brunhild
furiously vengeful concerning Kriemhild’s accusations of promiscuity. [Ger. Lit.: Nibelungenlied]
Erinyes
(the Furies) angry and avenging deities who pursue evil-doers. [Gk. Myth.: Leach, 347]
Fudd, Elmer
hapless man seethes over Bugs Bunny’s antics. [Comics: “Bugs Bunny” in Horn, 140]
Hera
(Rom. Juno) angry at Zeus’s illicit sexual pleasure. [Gk. Myth.: Leach, 563]
Herod
angry at wise men’s disobedience, orders slaughter of male infants. [N.T.: Matthew 2:16–17]
Hulk, the
character whose anger transforms him into monster. [Comics: Horn, 324–325]
Megaera
one of the three Furies, vengeful deities who punish evil-doers. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 274]
Nemesis
goddess of vengeance. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 173]
Oronte
takes offense at Alceste’s criticism of sonnet. [Fr. Lit.: The Misanthrope]
Othello
smothers wife, Desdemona, in paroxysm of rage over her suspected adultery. [Br. Lit.: Othello]
Rumpelstiltskin
stamps ground in rage over lass’s discovery of his name. [Ger. Fairy Tale: Rumpelstiltskin]
Tisiphone
one of the three Furies, vengeful deities who punish evil-doers. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 274]
Volumnia
“in anger, Junolike.” [Br. Lit.: Coriolanus]
whin
indicates fury. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 178]

Anger

(dreams)
This may be a carry-over from your daily life. In our dreams we can experience and express such feelings safely. Feeling great anger in your dream may be disturbing but pay attention to it and attempt to deal with all of your emotions in a more appropriate and productive manner. On a side note, many Jungian analysts believe that the emotions that we experience in dreams are not reliable, may have the opposite meaning, and in general should not be the only thing considered when interpreting a dream.
References in classic literature ?
To be angry once in a while is really good fun, because it makes others so miserable.
Why, if you are angry because you want to do magical things and can't, and if you don't want to get angry at all, my advice is not to want to do magical things.
And the King paced up and down his cavern more angry than before.
I must go and see them that I may make peace between them: they have been quarrelling, and are so angry that they have not slept with one another this long time.
Hector was angry that his spear should have been hurled in vain, and withdrew under cover of his men.
Ajax son of Telamon was more angry than any, for the man had fallen close beside him; so he aimed at Polydamas as he was retreating, but Polydamas saved himself by swerving aside and the spear struck Archelochus son of Antenor, for heaven counselled his destruction; it struck him where the head springs from the neck at the top joint of the spine, and severed both the tendons at the back of the head.
At last the bull was angry, and it saw the horse before it.
He could see him sailing upon the sea, and it made him very angry, so he wagged his head and muttered to himself, saying, "Good heavens, so the gods have been changing their minds about Ulysses while I was away in Ethiopia, and now he is close to the land of the Phaeacians, where it is decreed that he shall escape from the calamities that have befallen him.
My poor good man," said she, "why is Neptune so furiously angry with you?
You were angry that he had not entered those 700 rubles.
Rose looked at him with an embarrassment that made him angry with Philip.
He was angry with himself, and when Sharp came in a little while afterwards he seized upon the first opportunity to quarrel with him.