anisotropic magnetoresistance

anisotropic magnetoresistance

[‚an·ə·sə¦trō·pik ‚mag‚ned·ō·ri′sis·təns]
(solid-state physics)
A type of magnetoresistance displayed by all metallic magnetic materials, which arises because conduction electrons have more frequent collisions when they move parallel to the magnetization in the material than when they move perpendicular to it.
References in periodicals archive ?
Transmission anisotropy arises from anisotropic magnetoresistance inherent to ferromagnets.
It is not possible with other existing magnetic sensor technologies, including Anisotropic Magnetoresistance (AMR), Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR), or the Hall Effect.
This combination of benefits is unprecedented, and it is not achievable using any other existing magnetic sensor technologies, including Anisotropic Magnetoresistance (AMR), Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR), or the Hall Effect.