anorexia

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Related to anorectic: anorexigenic

anorexia

1. loss of appetite
2. a disorder characterized by fear of becoming fat and refusal of food, leading to debility and even death

anorexia

[‚an·ə′rek·sē·ə]
(medicine)
Loss of appetite.
References in periodicals archive ?
The use of metaphor and poetry therapy treatment of the reticent subgroup of anorectic patients.
Her solid body might be illustrated by Broca's image of a "physically fit" (Broca 2000: viii) and beautiful woman, a far cry from the anorectic ideal set up as a model for imitation for contemporary women.
Alterations inhostmetabolism by the specific and anorectic effects of the cattle-tick (Boophilus microoplus).
Thus, several million people in Europe have anorectic behavioral tendencies.
Increased TP content/production in the hypothalamus may be a signal for energy-sensing of satiety: studies of the anorectic mechanism of a plant steroidal glycoside," Brain Research, September 2004.
Suppression of the fatty-acid-synthesizing enzyme stearyl-CoA desaturase-1 can correct the hypometabolic phenotype of leptin deficiency, implying that leptin not only works via central anorectic effects but also by increasing hepatic fatty acid oxygenation (30).
It is also possible that the EAT-26, with its focus on body perception, food, and eating, is limited; hence, the instrument might not be sensitive enough to the long-recognized anorectic symptom of excessive exercise (Beumont, Beumont, Touyz, & Williams, 1997).
The eviscerated figure of withdrawal occupies a zone where presumed opposites inhabit the same space: The Hunger Artist is at once abject and proud, celebrity and loser, starving and sated, anorectic and overindulged.
Considerable individual variation in the time course of anorectic agent use and the severity of fen-phen valvulopathy was observed.
He had Clobenzorex, an anorectic [appetite suppressant] that breaks down as amphetamine, and methamphetamine.
The stigma associated with eating disorders frequently causes great suffering to the obese, but anorectic individuals are largely protected by their own feelings, however ill advised, that their emaciation is attractive, Dr.
Occasionally we decrease the ratio if a child becomes anorectic and will not eat, remains too acidotic, is experiencing frequent illnesses or is having persistent digestive difficulties on the diet.