anorogenic

anorogenic

[¦a‚nȯ·rō¦jen·ik]
(geology)
Of a feature, forming during tectonic quiescence between orogenic periods, that is, lacking in tectonic disturbance.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The younger granites in the study area are Jurassic (145-210Ma) in age and are high-level, anorogenic granites; they mainly consist of microgranites and biotite granites.
380 Ma Devonian plutons are composed mostly of monzogranite and are interpreted to have formed in an anorogenic, within-plate setting (Barr and Macdonald 1992).
the anorogenic nepheline syenite intrusion of the same name, are tabled below.
Anorogenic magmatism is linked to lithospheric extension, hotspots and intraplate rifting and various types of mineralization associated with this style of magmatism, including Sn, Nb, Ta, U, Th, F and Be in anorogenic granites (Sawkins 1984), and Olympic Data-type Cu-Au-U iron-oxide deposits.
The anorogenic magmatic rocks within the Estonian basement have been relatively well studied.
Yet geologists have found very little basaltic rock in North American anorogenic formations dating from 1.
The two permit areas are underlain by greywacke schists and supposed marine-laid tillites and In Darset has single basin of Pan-African conglomerates surrounding an anorogenic alkaline complex.
all basalt ([+ or -] komatiite)-dominated and (or) bimodal magmatism associated with divergent margins, or more generally extensional regimes, intraplate magmatic provinces, mantle plumes, anorogenic provinces, kimberlite and alkaline provinces; i.
As the Saaremaa zone crosscuts the post-orogenic plutonic rocks, it can be considered as formed during postorogenic and anorogenic faulting phases.
Furthermore, petrographic evidence shows that the MPG was saturated with water during crystallization, which also contrasts with the relatively "dry" nature of anorogenic A-type granitoids (Collins et al.