anoxia


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Related to anoxia: acidosis, cerebral palsy, necrosis, Arcoxia, Cerebral anoxia

anoxia

[a′näk·sē·ə]
(medicine)
The failure of oxygen to gain access to, or to be utilized by, the body tissues.

anoxia

A condition caused by a total lack of oxygen in the blood or tissues of the body. This condition is preceded by hypoxia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Changes in the extent of marine anoxia during the Early Jurassic: Evidence from molybdenum isotopes.
The bacteria and protozoa living in the termite gut have the ability to survive extreme conditions like anoxia.
Anoxia is considered as a key constraint to plant growth and survival during waterlogging (Gibbs and Greenway 2003; Greenway and Gibbs 2003).
Global Anoxia = brain injury to the brain caused by lack of oxygen, not limited to any specific part of the brain.
1], indicando uma oxiclina muito estavel (Figura 6b); neste periodo, em media foi registrado condicao de anoxia sempre abaixo de 4 m.
Aside from negative effects on aquatic life and taste and odor of water, anoxia exacerbates algal growth due to the release of nutrients from sediment into the water column that become available for phytoplankton growth in epilimnion (Nurnberg 1988; Horne & Goldman 1994; Kelton & Chow-Fraser 2005).
Among the topics are the tectonics of Pangea and the Paleo-Tethys during the Late Permian, anoxia and its products, the history of global redox conditions in the Late Permian, and the end-Permian extinction.
He had not suffered any catastrophic event such as ventilator disconnection or cardiac arrest causing anoxia.
This mechanism of increased red cell production is activated in response to increased red cell destruction in conditions such as haemolysis, haemorrhage, anoxia or high attitude (3), and by the stimulation of erythropoietin production and release from the kidney, liver and rarely the spleen.
Protective effect of DM-9384, a novel pyrrolidone derivative, against experimental cerebral anoxia.
During the 20th century, two periods with low numbers of smelt (1959 and 1972-1975) were caused by summer anoxia (Pihu, 1966; Pihu & Kangur, 2001).
However, it is thought to be related to SBA levels causing an increase in myometrial contractivity of the uterus, with stillborn infants showing signs of acute anoxia and meconium stained liquor.