anoxia

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anoxia

[a′näk·sē·ə]
(medicine)
The failure of oxygen to gain access to, or to be utilized by, the body tissues.

anoxia

A condition caused by a total lack of oxygen in the blood or tissues of the body. This condition is preceded by hypoxia.
References in periodicals archive ?
We don't know if the ocean is headed toward another global anoxic event, but the trend is, of course, worrying.
The correlation between the occurrence of organic-rich deposits and the climatic, and sea level changes, allows to analyze the current criteria used to define the postulated Oceanic Anoxic Events and apply them as a guide for hydrocarbon exploration.
A careful history is critical to establish the possibility of a recent anoxic event.
It is obvious that the oceanic setting at the time of black shale formation was anoxic; hence the expression "Oceanic Anoxic Event" was introduced to denote the events in the mid-1970s.
However, simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) has recently been found at various types of process units with advantages over the conventional processes like two-step process (aerobic/anoxic phases) such as the cost saving for anoxic tank and the addition of external carbon sources during the denitrification (Munch et al.
The pilot unit was operated under a sequencing batch regime, and an electrical control panel controlled the duration of each stage of the cycle (Feeding, Anoxic and Aeration/Filtration phases).
17 [per thousand] [17], which have been associated with other Early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs) in Europe.
The 18 papers discuss such topics as using cement-treated lightweight soils made from dredged clay, incorporating public health impact assessment into the optioneering process for a dredge licensing application, remediating river sediments containing dioxins and other chemical compounds as part of a large watershed restoration project, evaluating adverse effects of anoxic sediments on aestivating sand lance (Ammodytes personatus), sediment contamination due to oil-suspended particulate matter aggregation during oil spills in coastal waters, and evaluating the oil absorbing ability of peat using a column test.
Our results suggest that most of the deep ocean was likely anoxic, compared to something much less than 1 percent today," he stated.