anoxia

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anoxia

[a′näk·sē·ə]
(medicine)
The failure of oxygen to gain access to, or to be utilized by, the body tissues.

anoxia

A condition caused by a total lack of oxygen in the blood or tissues of the body. This condition is preceded by hypoxia.
References in periodicals archive ?
1], whereby the aerobic and anoxic phases were formed at upper and lower zone, respectively.
This confirms the results and conclusions drawn above from the Ce anomaly, supporting the suboxic to anoxic conditions of the palaeobasin.
2000) studied microbial Fe(III) reduction in anoxic mining-impacted lake sediments.
which is related to the global oceanic anoxic event during the peak of transgression in the Early Jurassic [17].
We believe that the occurrence of persistent giant negative U waves in the absence of apparent cardiac disease is a unique clinical finding and likely somehow related to our patient's previous anoxic brain injury.
One aquarium had normoxic conditions (n = 110) whereas another aquarium was filled with anoxic seawater (n = 256).
Through collaboration, negotiation, and if needed, litigation, CASE hopes to drive corrective action to prevent another massive fish die-off in the marsh, an event which typically occurs each winter as anoxic water infiltrates the freshwater lagoon and literally suffocates hundreds of fish and shellfish.
That warmer, nutrient-rich water carried much less oxygen; it's what we call anoxic water, meaning water without oxygen.
Mensch that the decedent did not exhibit symptoms of anoxic brain damage on the day after reintuhation and further ignored evidence in the medical records regarding a previously undetected injury that appeared on a CT scan of the decedent's head taken on February 4, 2000, that was suggestive of either a nonhemorrhagic contusion from the automobile accident or a cerebral artery infarct.
The air supply is not given during anoxic mode of the react period.
Dissolved oxygen concentrations reached anoxic conditions that persisted from June through September and often reached 50% of the depth at monitored sites.