anthropic principle


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anthropic principle

(an-throp -ik) A principle that was put forward in the 1960s by R. Dicke and maintains that the presence of life in the Universe places constraints on the ways in which the very early Universe evolved: the possible initial conditions are limited to those that give rise to an inhabited Universe, i.e. what we observe must be restricted by the conditions necessary for our presence as observers.

anthropic principle

[an′thräp·ik ′prin·sə·pəl]
(astronomy)
The assertion that the presence of intelligent life on earth places limits on the many ways the universe could have developed and could have caused the conditions of temperature that prevail today.
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to avoid questions about how these properties became so finely tuned, the anthropic principle is combined with the idea that our universe is part of a multiverse, in which each universe has randomly determined properties.
Finally, all of this would not be possible if the conditions that gave rise to the anthropic principle were not at work.
On the other hand, dialectic holism, the anthropic principle, the co-naturality of thought and reality allow us to foresee much more than a simple accidental and factitious firework: thought is possibly more a fundamental feature of the unity of reality.
Thus (and here we are, back in the material world), as physics suggests in that anthropic principle, consciousness seems--no doubt merely seems embedded in the fabric of the universe.
The anthropic principle is often used as a religious argument for special creation with reasoning like this, "The reason our universe is so peculiar and well-fitted to life is because the Creator wanted (willed) it to be that way for the formation of life.
Moreover, Glynn's exposition of the anthropic principle has been greeted with enthusiasm in conservative intellectual circles, where arguments for natural "design" were previously limited to critiques of evolutionary biology.
They appeal to theories such as the anthropic principle (conditions required for life to develop) to make a case for design in the universe, and thus the need for a designer (God).
Plainly she missed out on a "quiet revolution in scientific understanding" known as the Anthropic Principle.
And love between men and women keeps breaking in, love in all its many forms, even love defined, in the story ``Love Explained,'' in terms of ``the Participatory Anthropic Principle,'' which states, ``The observer is as essential to the creation of the universe as the universe is to the creation of the observer.
His position is a variant of the well-known anthropic principle, which indeed has many variants but fundamentally asserts that "from a cosmological point of view the existence and processes of the universe cannot be fully explained unless the human species is understood as an inherent phenomenon" (55).
Taking his book at face value, he does not even know how to define the fine-tuning of our universe, which is the anthropic principle.
This is often called the Weak Anthropic Principle (often abbreviated as WAP) and is nowadays generally dismissed as a poor argument in favor of God's existence.