anthropocentric


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anthropocentric

[¦an·thrə‚pō¦sen·trik]
(psychology)
Regarding humankind as the most important factor in the universe.
Evaluating all occurrences solely by human values.

anthropocentric

viewing humankind as of central importance within the universe.
References in periodicals archive ?
Such Western anthropocentric and androcentric ways of thinking reached their peak in the 19th century's efforts of European colonization.
Through the action of contemporary secular acceptance of sympathetic magic and "animetaphor" (Lippit: 1998: 1112-1113) rhetoric the bronze dog's nose is quite literally being rubbed off--a gesture that echoes the erasure of the real figure of the dog that may have been a model for this sculpture, and the human reduction of non-human creatures to the level of anthropocentric device.
However, rather than dichotomously defining the narrative "Big Two-Hearted River" as a story about shell shock and recovery that insists upon the landscape as a metaphor and anthropocentric mirror, I would like to suggest a different reading of nature in the text.
Potts's conclusion to her study of pastoral, once again, discusses the traits of a post-pastoral poetry which must pay close attention to ecological concerns and abandon an anthropocentric view of the world.
In Bletsoe's work three of the abiding motifs of landscape poetry" intersect: a questioning of what space is left for lyric subjectivity given the dominance of scientific discourses on nature; an inhabitation of opposed linguistic registers as a means for grasping the land; and an awareness of the resistance of the land to any form of assimilation, be it anthropocentric conceit or technological exploitation.
In the final analysis, Calvino's fictional world in The Castle of Crossed Destinies is bereft of anthropocentric despotism.
13) By analogy, we cannot have a real ecological sensibility if we are stuck with an anthropocentric perspective, which betrays a left-brain mode.
This analysis concluded that while Strong's doctrine of baptism is orthodox, Baptist, and biblical and has a clear Christocentric framework, oddities within it can be tied to an anthropocentric shift.
The perspective has to change from an anthropocentric world with humans as actors and in control to a world where silicon can speak to silicon without any human involvement.
Kowalewski likewise does this by not only presenting a hopeful pedagogy, but a pedagogy that transcends anthropocentric understandings of nature.
People tend to have a rather anthropocentric view of time based on their personal experiences.