anti-isomorphism

anti-isomorphism

[‚an·tē‚ī·sə′mȯr‚fiz·əm]
(mathematics)
A one-to-one correspondence between two rings, fields, or integral domains such that, if x ′ corresponds to x and y ′ corresponds to y, then x ′+ y corresponds to x + y, but yx ′ corresponds to xy.
References in periodicals archive ?
3 The map [phi] is an isomorphism of coalgebras and an anti-isomorphism ([phi](a x b) = [phi](b) x [phi](a)) of one-sided algebras.
If A [subset or equal to] B(H) is a unital algebra and [pi] is an anti-isomorphism of B(H), we let [pi](A) denote the algebra {[pi](A): A [element of] A}.
There are also induced transpose maps in B(H [idirect sum] K) and B(K [idirect sum] H) and all are anti-isomorphisms of period 2.