antiatom


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antiatom

[′an·tē‚ad·əm]
(atomic physics)
An atom made up of antiprotons, antineutrons, and positrons in the same way that an ordinary atom is made up of protons, neutrons, and electrons.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Another experiment, starting in May, should detect the signature and determining whether it has anything to do with antiatoms.
Creating a single antiatom was difficult - and for now, scientists say, making the millions needed for rocket fuel is impossible.
Because when antiatoms meet up with regular atoms, they crash and destroy one another, leaving behind a unique trail of subatomic debris.
The crash also gives off lots of energy - so much that some scientists believe antiatoms could one day be used as a lightweight rocket fuel for interstellar space travel.
Produced in an accelerator, these antiatoms lasted only 40 billionths of a second before annihilating in collisions with particles of ordinary matter.
During 3 weeks of observations, Oelert's team identified nine cases in which antiatoms had been created.
There are 100-odd years of atomic physics that we can learn how to do again with antiatoms.
However, the antiatoms created at CERN and Fermilab travel far too quickly and don't last long enough for researchers to measure their characteristics.
Now, researchers have developed a convenient technique for capturing and chilling positrons in an environment suited to the production of antiatoms.