antiballistic missile


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antiballistic missile:

see guided missileguided missile,
self-propelled, unmanned space or air vehicle carrying an explosive warhead. Its path can be adjusted during flight, either by automatic self-contained controls or remote human control. Guided missiles are powered either by rocket engines or by jet propulsion.
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antiballistic missile

[‚an·tē·bə′lis·tik ′mis·əl]
(ordnance)
Any object thrown, dropped, fired, or otherwise projected with the purpose of intercepting a ballistic missile. Abbreviated ABM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps the most extreme case was President Nixon's instruction to his staff to revoke federal research funds to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology because of his annoyance with MIT President Jerome Wiesner's opposition to the antiballistic missile program.
Additionally, Waldron said that in 2002 the United States withdrew from the Antiballistic Missile Treaty of 1972 to develop a national missile defense system.
At the same time as the CIA announced that one of its drones had killed Salim Sinan Al Harethi from afar, the Israeli Defence Force was unveiling its latest Arrow-2 "Homa" or "Barrier" antiballistic missile system.
In June 2002, the AntiBallistic Missile Treaty was dissolved by the US, who argued the treaty would restrict testing for the proposed missile defence system.
Russia's Vladimir Putin has moved a great deal since previous talks in January, when he opposed the scuppering of the 1972 antiballistic missile treaty and the US National Missile Defence programme.
An Antiballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty, signed in 1972, prohibited either side from protecting itself with a missile shield.
It stated its determination to get rid of the Antiballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty whether the Russians liked it or not.
Bush insisted on junking the 1972 Antiballistic Missile Treaty, a cornerstone of nuclear arms control, to build an American missile shield; Putin said the move would trigger a new nuclear arms race.
At the same time, an estimated 100 demonstrations were taking place in 19 countries across the world to protest against President George Bush's plans for a new antiballistic missile treaty.
The Bush Administration has announced its intention of breaking out of the antiballistic missile treaty of 1972, which bans antinuclear defenses, and the Russians have answered that if this treaty is abandoned the whole framework of nuclear arms control built up over thirty years may collapse.
His endorsement of new antiballistic missile defenses is not based on a serious discussion of the threat from rogue states, perhaps because he advocates defenses that could stop "established non-rogue nuclear powers" as well.