anticenter

anticenter

[¦an·tē′sent·ər]
(astronomy)
The direction in the sky opposite to that of the center of the Galaxy, located in the constellation Auriga.
(geology)
The point on the surface of the earth that is diametrically opposite the epicenter of an earthquake. Also known as antiepicenter.
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References in periodicals archive ?
From Sagittarius, the hazy band of white light appears to pass westward to the Galactic anticenter in Auriga.
The galaxy's center (galactic longitude and latitude 0[degrees]) is in extreme western Sagittarius, and the anticenter (longitude 180[degrees], latitude 0[degrees]) is located on the Taurus-Gemini border 3 1/2[degrees] east of Beta ([beta]) Tauri, the star also known as Elnath.
At the sidereal time shown on our all-sky map, the galactic anticenter is near the zenith for mid-northern observers.
Longitude 180[degrees], the galactic anticenter, is near Beta ([beta]) Tauri on the Taurus-Auriga border.
The center itself is just above the southwest horizon, and the galactic anticenter is just below the northeast horizon.
Stand with the galactic center in Sagittarius on your left and the galactic anticenter (on the Taurus-Auriga border) on your right.
The distribution in the Cygnus and Carina directions is intermediate between those of the center and anticenter directions.
The numerous small ones appear to be fairly uniformly spread over the sky, except for one remarkable grouping near the galactic anticenter.
Were we to divide the galactic plane into quadrants, the galactic center and anticenter would be key points.
The sights of the Northern Hemisphere's winter sky are grand indeed--the Orion Nebula, the Pleiades, and the Hyades--but few casual observers go out of their way to admire the galactic anticenter, near the border between Taurus and Auriga.
My adventure to the anticenter began one cold winter night in 2003, when I attached my 35-millimeter camera to a fixed tripod and took a 20-second exposure of Taurus and its surroundings.
Here we are looking at right angles to both the galactic center and anticenter into the depths of the Milky Way's disk along our spiral arm.