anticipation

(redirected from anticipate)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial.

anticipation

Music an unstressed, usually short note introduced before a downbeat and harmonically related to the chord immediately following it

Anticipation

 

in psychology and philosophy, the ability to react to events ahead of time. This concept of “anticipation” is closest to the concept introduced in psychology by the German scientist W. Wundt. Psychologists distinguish two senses in which the term “anticipation” is used: (1) an organism’s expectation of a certain situation, which is manifested in some pose or movement; and (2) manifestation by a human being of the results of his action even before the action is performed (hence the definition of the goal as the anticipated subject).

In philosophy, the concept of anticipation is encountered as far back as the Stoics and Epicureans in reference to prolepsis—the general concept of knowledge before the perception of concrete individual things directly from the Logos. F. Bacon took a firm position against anticipation, proceeding from the principle that nature has to be studied, not anticipated. Kant used the term to mean “a priori knowledge of subjects of perception before the perceptions themselves.”

In logic, anticipation is used to denote temporary acceptance of a proposition which is to be proved subsequently, as if it were already proven.

V. A. KOSTELOVSKII

anticipation

[an‚tis·ə′pā·shən]
(genetics)
The occurrence of a phenotype at a younger age or in a more severe form in succeeding generations of a family.
References in periodicals archive ?
482-7(c)(1) permits a controlled taxpayer to be a controlled participant in a CSA only if it reasonably anticipates that it will derive benefits from the use of covered intangibles.
We encourage physician executives to view negotiation as an indeterminate, iterative, and often confusing process that requires them to anticipate and to monitor the actions of the other party.