anticoagulant

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anticoagulant

(ăn'tēkōăg`yələnt), any of several substances that inhibit blood clot formation (see blood clottingblood clotting,
process by which the blood coagulates to form solid masses, or clots. In minor injuries, small oval bodies called platelets, or thrombocytes, tend to collect and form plugs in blood vessel openings.
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). Some anticoagulants, such as the coumarin derivatives bishydroxycoumarin (Dicumarol) and warfarin (Coumadin) inhibit synthesis of prothrombin, a clot-forming substance, and other clotting factors. The coumarin derivatives compete with vitamin K, which is a necessary substance in prothrombin formation (see vitaminvitamin,
group of organic substances that are required in the diet of humans and animals for normal growth, maintenance of life, and normal reproduction. Vitamins act as catalysts; very often either the vitamins themselves are coenzymes, or they form integral parts of coenzymes.
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). They are only effective after the body's existing supply of prothrombin is depleted. Another anticoagulant, heparin, is a polysaccharide (see carbohydratecarbohydrate,
any member of a large class of chemical compounds that includes sugars, starches, cellulose, and related compounds. These compounds are produced naturally by green plants from carbon dioxide and water (see photosynthesis).
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) found naturally in many cells. It acts in several ways: by preventing prothrombin formation; by preventing formation of fibrin, another clotting substance; and by decreasing the availability of a third clotting factor, thrombin. Heparin is obtained by extracting it from animal tissues. Anticoagulants are used to treat blood clots, which appear especially frequently in veins of the legs and pelvis in bedridden patients. Therapy helps to reduce the risk of clots reaching the lung, heart, or other organs. Heparin causes an instantaneous increase in blood-clotting time, and its effect lasts several hours.

anticoagulant

[¦an·tē‚kō′ag·yə·lənt]
(pharmacology)
An agent, such as sodium citrate, that prevents coagulation of a colloid, especially blood.

anticoagulant

1. acting to prevent or impair coagulation, esp of blood
2. an agent, such as warfarin, that prevents or impairs coagulation
References in periodicals archive ?
ARYx currently has four products in clinical development: an oral anti-arrhythmic agent for the treatment of atrial fibrillation, budiodarone (previously ATI-2042); a prokinetic agent for the treatment of various gastrointestinal disorders, ATI-7505; an oral anticoagulant agent for patients at risk for the formation of dangerous blood clots, tecarfarin (previously ATI-5923); and, an agent for the treatment of schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders, ATI-9242.
ARYx currently has four products in clinical development: an oral anti-arrhythmic agent for the treatment of atrial fibrillation, budiodarone (previously named ATI-2042); an oral anticoagulant agent for patients at risk for the formation of dangerous blood clots, tecarfarin (previously named ATI-5923); a prokinetic agent for the treatment of various gastrointestinal disorders, ATI-7505; and, an agent for the treatment of schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders, ATI-9242.
The section of "Diagnosis" inquired about the dentists' major concerns while managing these patients as well as the theoretical knowledge about screening of different medical conditions associated with the use of OAT and identification of the newer oral anticoagulant agents.
The AAN guideline also provides general recommendations on the use of novel oral anticoagulant agents (NOACs) as alternatives to warfarin.
Although VKA's are still the only available oral anticoagulant agents for stroke and systemic embolism prevention in patients with valvular AF, new anticoagulant agents have shown promise as an alternative to VKA in patients with non-valvular AF
Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia or Puncture: When neuraxial anesthesia (spinal/epidural anesthesia) or spinal puncture is employed, patients treated with anticoagulant agents for prevention of thromboembolic complications are at risk of developing an epidural or spinal hematoma, which can result in long-term or permanent paralysis.
He said that the development of new oral anticoagulant agents, like Apixaban, has raised hope of a standard of care for DVT prevention that is as effective as or more effective than current standard approaches as well as being equally safe and more convenient for patients.
Currently, therapeutic strategies range from no treatment to the use of anti-inflammatory drugs, anticoagulant agents, or even surgery.
Protocols related to diagnosis and therapy in the light of new developments in anticoagulant agents and thrombolytic therapy require focus.

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