anticoagulant

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anticoagulant

(ăn'tēkōăg`yələnt), any of several substances that inhibit blood clot formation (see blood clottingblood clotting,
process by which the blood coagulates to form solid masses, or clots. In minor injuries, small oval bodies called platelets, or thrombocytes, tend to collect and form plugs in blood vessel openings.
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). Some anticoagulants, such as the coumarin derivatives bishydroxycoumarin (Dicumarol) and warfarin (Coumadin) inhibit synthesis of prothrombin, a clot-forming substance, and other clotting factors. The coumarin derivatives compete with vitamin K, which is a necessary substance in prothrombin formation (see vitaminvitamin,
group of organic substances that are required in the diet of humans and animals for normal growth, maintenance of life, and normal reproduction. Vitamins act as catalysts; very often either the vitamins themselves are coenzymes, or they form integral parts of coenzymes.
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). They are only effective after the body's existing supply of prothrombin is depleted. Another anticoagulant, heparin, is a polysaccharide (see carbohydratecarbohydrate,
any member of a large class of chemical compounds that includes sugars, starches, cellulose, and related compounds. These compounds are produced naturally by green plants from carbon dioxide and water (see photosynthesis).
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) found naturally in many cells. It acts in several ways: by preventing prothrombin formation; by preventing formation of fibrin, another clotting substance; and by decreasing the availability of a third clotting factor, thrombin. Heparin is obtained by extracting it from animal tissues. Anticoagulants are used to treat blood clots, which appear especially frequently in veins of the legs and pelvis in bedridden patients. Therapy helps to reduce the risk of clots reaching the lung, heart, or other organs. Heparin causes an instantaneous increase in blood-clotting time, and its effect lasts several hours.

anticoagulant

[¦an·tē‚kō′ag·yə·lənt]
(pharmacology)
An agent, such as sodium citrate, that prevents coagulation of a colloid, especially blood.

anticoagulant

1. acting to prevent or impair coagulation, esp of blood
2. an agent, such as warfarin, that prevents or impairs coagulation
References in periodicals archive ?
In the present study, we sought to determine those conditions that allow or preclude clinicians to evaluate dPT-based LA test during the administration of different anticoagulant drugs.
According to an FDA resource about atrial fibrillation and anticoagulant drugs, Xarelto, unlike other anticoagulants such as its alternative warfarin, no reversal agents exist for use when significant bleeding occurs.
The launch of new anticoagulant drugs, which do not require testing for coagulation, will restrain growth beyond 2017.
Apixaban is a novel factor Xa inhibitor, part of a class of anticoagulant drugs developed from compounds identified in leeches and ticks.
Caution must be taken with potential allergic reactions, and patients taking anticoagulant drugs should avoid the intake of this fruit.
People taking anticoagulant drugs, those who suffer high blood pressure or heart failure, or have a disease where the blood does not clot properly, will all be prone to nosebleeds which might be more prolonged, and these people are more likely to need to see a nurse or doctor.
We thought that vigorous cough attacks in our patient with bronchitis probably caused rectus muscle sheath hematoma in the base of oral anticoagulant drugs use.
Patients who take anticoagulant drugs like Coumadin[R] should be aware that some studies have shown that the omega-3 fatty acids EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) found in fish oil can prolong bleeding times.
This time Diane is put on a course of special anticoagulant drugs and a first scan confirms four live foetuses.
However, because it contains vitamin K, known for blood-clotting properties, it could reduce the effectiveness of anticoagulant drugs, according to Irena Chalmers in "The Great Food Almanac.

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