anticoagulant

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anticoagulant

(ăn'tēkōăg`yələnt), any of several substances that inhibit blood clot formation (see blood clottingblood clotting,
process by which the blood coagulates to form solid masses, or clots. In minor injuries, small oval bodies called platelets, or thrombocytes, tend to collect and form plugs in blood vessel openings.
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). Some anticoagulants, such as the coumarin derivatives bishydroxycoumarin (Dicumarol) and warfarin (Coumadin) inhibit synthesis of prothrombin, a clot-forming substance, and other clotting factors. The coumarin derivatives compete with vitamin K, which is a necessary substance in prothrombin formation (see vitaminvitamin,
group of organic substances that are required in the diet of humans and animals for normal growth, maintenance of life, and normal reproduction. Vitamins act as catalysts; very often either the vitamins themselves are coenzymes, or they form integral parts of coenzymes.
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). They are only effective after the body's existing supply of prothrombin is depleted. Another anticoagulant, heparin, is a polysaccharide (see carbohydratecarbohydrate,
any member of a large class of chemical compounds that includes sugars, starches, cellulose, and related compounds. These compounds are produced naturally by green plants from carbon dioxide and water (see photosynthesis).
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) found naturally in many cells. It acts in several ways: by preventing prothrombin formation; by preventing formation of fibrin, another clotting substance; and by decreasing the availability of a third clotting factor, thrombin. Heparin is obtained by extracting it from animal tissues. Anticoagulants are used to treat blood clots, which appear especially frequently in veins of the legs and pelvis in bedridden patients. Therapy helps to reduce the risk of clots reaching the lung, heart, or other organs. Heparin causes an instantaneous increase in blood-clotting time, and its effect lasts several hours.

anticoagulant

[¦an·tē‚kō′ag·yə·lənt]
(pharmacology)
An agent, such as sodium citrate, that prevents coagulation of a colloid, especially blood.

anticoagulant

1. acting to prevent or impair coagulation, esp of blood
2. an agent, such as warfarin, that prevents or impairs coagulation
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, 38% of major bleeds among patients with transient risk factors occurred during the first 3 months of anticoagulation therapy.
3) As many as 30%-35% of patients may experience clinical signs of venous insufficiency at 6 years even when treated with anticoagulation following filter placement.
Where oral anticoagulation was used, most patients (72%) were prescribed warfarin and just 8% were prescribed a new oral anticoagulant.
Thus, almost all patients with AF have more to gain than to lose from anticoagulation with warfarin.
It might become an alternative for atrial fibrillation patients who are ineligible for long-term anticoagulation therapy.
The Anticoagulation Forum has proposed nine key domains (Table 1) that are essential to establishing and maintaining a high-quality ACC (Garcia et al.
In our case, minimal anticoagulation was possible and it probably allowed performance of adequate VVC[O.
Despite widespread availability of these treatments, only 18% of AF patients who could benefit from anticoagulation receive adequate therapy, it adds.
Doctors typically prescribe anticoagulation medication, including Coumadin, Jantoven, warfarin and low molecular weight heparin, to reduce the risk of dangerous blood clots in people who have had heart attacks, strokes or other blood clotting conditions.
We collected and citrate-treated blood samples from 20 patients in the initial phase of oral anticoagulation treatment (between day 3 and day 7 after starting with a standard loading dosage of acenocoumarol: day 1, 6 mg; day 2,4 mg; day 3, 2 mg), 20 patients with a highly increased INR (>5) not yet stabilized on oral anticoagulation, and 20 patients on stable oral anticoagulation (within the therapeutic INR interval of 2.
There are laboratory and medical restraints with this class of drugs such as there is typically no good or standardized method of testing anticoagulation status, there is no antidote (such as protamine sulfate for the heparins) and renal or liver dysfunction may make these drugs not viable.

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