antihero


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antihero

a central character in a novel, play, etc., who lacks the traditional heroic virtues
References in periodicals archive ?
In Detective, as in Antihero, I found the introduction too short as issues of terminology and classification needed some clarification and this was not forthcoming.
antiHERO Laptop and Desktop Graphic Novel Ebook Chapters: http://www.
In literary terms, an antihero is a self-styled social outcast or rebel with whom readers tend to identify but who lacks the traditional attributes, physical prowess among them, generally associated with heroes such as Achilles or Ivanhoe.
McEvoy's antiheroic musical comedy revue, "The Comic Supplement" (1925, in which Fields starred as part of the "Ziegfeld Follies")--the comedian's own writing roots were tied to the world of the antihero.
Lyrics like "My behind is a beehive / There's a buzz in my back side" ("I Luv the Valley") and "We'll catch loan unawares, but / What if he doesn't wear underwear" ("Crank Heart") will have Moz fans waxing nostalgic, thanking their lucky stars that there is a new clever-tongued, self-effacing, angst-filled antihero to love.
Miss Black America, Antihero and Cultural Ice Age will be at The Cluny as part of the Love Music, Hate Racism tour.
Even in the most traditional and conservative societies there has always been a space for the accepted provocateur, the antihero, the neighborhood loony who performs the role of being the public consciousness of that place, making sure that madness gets protected.
If this trend continues, it's only a matter of time before a great country that birthed the trigger-happy apocalyptic antihero Mad Max becomes a place where no one is allowed to possess anything sharper than safety scissors.
Antihero from Stratford have gone from strength to strength, and have been making waves on the music scene since their first demo track, MTV, was played on Radio 1 by DJ Steve Lamacq in April.
When Howard Hawks brought Borden Chase's novel The Chisholm Trail to the silver screen, he cast John Wayne in one of the Duke's few antihero roles and offered a dark study of courage stripped of justice or decency.
Turley's declared purpose "is twofold: to analyze how eighteenth-century writers perceived the pirate and to show how the pirate came to be portrayed as both the criminal and the romanticized antihero par excellence in the following centuries" (3).