antihydrogen


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Related to antihydrogen: antihelium

antihydrogen

[¦an·tē′hī·drə·jən]
(atomic physics)
The antimatter counterpart of hydrogen, whose atoms each consist of an orbiting positron and a nucleus that is an antiproton, antideuteron, or antitriton.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ALPHA experiment reports a measurement of the electric charge of antihydrogen atoms, finding it to be compatible with zero to eight decimal places.
Alpha was the first experiment to trap atoms of antihydrogen - neutral antimatter atoms held in place with a strong magnetic field for up to 1,000 seconds.
Antihydrogen is made of an antiproton and a positron.
ALPHA announced in November, 2010, that they had succeeded in storing antimatter atoms for the first time ever, having captured 38 atoms of antihydrogen and storing each for a sixth of a second.
An antihydrogen atom is made from a negatively charged antiproton and a positively charged positron, the antimatter counterpart of the electron.
Concerned with antiproton beams with kinetic energies of order keV or less, the papers delve into such topics as CPT symmetry and gravitation, the structure of exotic nuclei, atomic collisions, and atom physics in general, with particular focus on recent advances in manipulating large numbers of ultra-slow antiprotons and synthesizing antihydrogen atoms.
After mixing cold clouds of trapped positrons and antiprotons - the antiparticles of the familiar electron and proton - under closely-monitored conditions, researchers identified antihydrogen atoms, formed when positrons bind together with antiprotons.
Their strategy is to deny access to a natural source of antihydrogen, a necessary fuel source for Earth's ships.
A single atom of antimatter - in particular, antihydrogen - may unlock fundamental mysteries of our universe and could lead to revolutionary advances in medicine and space travel.
The scientists created antihydrogen because of its simple structure, explains John Eades, coordinator of the experiments.
Specific to Norsat's BUC, the researchers are currently working on a method to find out what colour light the antihydrogen shines when it is hit with microwaves.
For the purpose of this experiment, the researchers associated with the ALPHA collaboration at CERN used antihydrogen atoms - the antimatter equivalent of hydrogen atoms.