antinomianism

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antinomianism

(ăntĭnō`mēənĭzəm) [Gr.,=against the law], the belief that Christians are not bound by the moral law, particularly that of the Old Testament. The idea was strong among the Gnostics, especially MarcionMarcion
, c.85–c.160, early Christian bishop, founder of the Marcionites, one of the first great Christian heresies to rival Catholic Christianity. He was born in Sinope. He taught in Asia Minor, then went (c.135) to Rome, where he perfected his theory.
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. Certain heretical sects in the Middle Ages practiced sexual license as an expression of Christian freedom. In the Protestant Reformation theoretical antinomian views were maintained by the Anabaptists and Johann Agricola, and in the 17th cent. Anne Hutchinson was persecuted for supposed antinomianism. Rom. 6 is the usual refutation for antinomianism.

antinomianism

the beliefs held, e.g. by the members of some Protestant sects in the 16th and 17th centuries, that, as members of ‘God's elect’, they could no longer be guilty of sin. As WEBER (1922) put it, such persons felt themselves ‘certain of salvation’, and ‘no longer bound by any conventional rule of conduct’. This belief was interpreted by some believers as permitting them to engage in unorthodox marital practices, including plural marriages, as well as in sexual activity outside marriage, which they justified as bringing others to salvation. Weber's view was that antinomianism is a generally occurring phenomenon, and that the more systematically the ‘practical psychological character’ of a religious faith develops, the greater is the tendency for antinomianism to be the outcome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Little is known of the antinomian incumbent of the Wiltshire living of Brinkworth, to which Crisp was presented in 1627.
His influential collection of documents and narratives about the controversy, A Short Story of the Rise, reign, and ruine of the Antinomians, Familists, and Libertines that infected the churches of New-England (1644), is regarded as unsympathetic to Hutchinson but a "basically accurate" account of her church trial (198).
This cliched language bespeaks the psychopathologies of piety that Theodore Dwight Bozeman examines in The Precisianist Strain: Disciplinary Religion & Antinomian Backlash in Puritanism to 1638 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004), esp.
Cottons Rejoynder," in The Antinomian Controversy, 1636-1638: A Documentary History, 2nd ed.
Calvinism doesn't actually condone moral anarchy, though its answer to Antinomians is not that different from an exasperated parent's insistence that a toddler should obey "because I said so.
The antinomian character of the Church's teaching on love, moreover, represents another cause for concern.
Trungpa's successor, Thomas Rich (given the Tibetan name Osel Tendzin), appointed in 1976, carried on Trungpa's tradition of antinomian behaviors, eventually dying of AIDS.
This chapter culminates with a marvelous if overstated lengthy section on the antinomian tendencies of Isma'IlI revolutionary esotericism.
The theology that backed up the 'paradigm shift' at LSTC was either antinomian or a close relative" (Memoirs, 121).
Lyric's strength in music and poetry, Brown argues, derives rather from its "skeptical restraint" and "prosaic sobriety" (a delightfully antinomian formulation).
There is a strong antinomian element in Ammons's makeup.
In the past fifteen years, the plays have been read as affirming Anglican Christianity, critiquing antinomian thought, promoting anti-Catholic propaganda, imagining an ideal Calvinist world, and representing the apocalypse.