antinomianism

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antinomianism

(ăntĭnō`mēənĭzəm) [Gr.,=against the law], the belief that Christians are not bound by the moral law, particularly that of the Old Testament. The idea was strong among the Gnostics, especially MarcionMarcion
, c.85–c.160, early Christian bishop, founder of the Marcionites, one of the first great Christian heresies to rival Catholic Christianity. He was born in Sinope. He taught in Asia Minor, then went (c.135) to Rome, where he perfected his theory.
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. Certain heretical sects in the Middle Ages practiced sexual license as an expression of Christian freedom. In the Protestant Reformation theoretical antinomian views were maintained by the Anabaptists and Johann Agricola, and in the 17th cent. Anne Hutchinson was persecuted for supposed antinomianism. Rom. 6 is the usual refutation for antinomianism.

antinomianism

the beliefs held, e.g. by the members of some Protestant sects in the 16th and 17th centuries, that, as members of ‘God's elect’, they could no longer be guilty of sin. As WEBER (1922) put it, such persons felt themselves ‘certain of salvation’, and ‘no longer bound by any conventional rule of conduct’. This belief was interpreted by some believers as permitting them to engage in unorthodox marital practices, including plural marriages, as well as in sexual activity outside marriage, which they justified as bringing others to salvation. Weber's view was that antinomianism is a generally occurring phenomenon, and that the more systematically the ‘practical psychological character’ of a religious faith develops, the greater is the tendency for antinomianism to be the outcome.
References in periodicals archive ?
He argues that Buddhist antinomian traditions originated from Buddhist monastic professionals rather than outcast or tribal communities, as previously examined.
These two versions of an antinomian poetics suggest that writing
This is especially true when he conflates those who reject a Lutheran teaching of the third use of the law with antinomian heretics, as he does with Bertram and Schroeder.
Social conservatism is extremely isolated in what has become an ever more anti-traditional and antinomian Canada.
It is clearly this specifically Antinomian notion that is of most interest to Hogg and thus to Gil-Martin, for when Robert sheepishly admits to his companion that he "did not think the Scripture promises to the elect, taken in their utmost latitude, warranted the assurance that they could do no wrong," he is instantly rebuked.
To turn next to Clarissa might seem perverse, but Conway makes a strong case that Richardson's implacably virtuous protagonist allows him, within the microcosm of the family, to investigate quasi-monarchical authority in ways reminiscent of Behn: Clarissa's "radical antinomian impulses .
Harvey links this often-overlooked challenge to the Antinomian conflict with Hutchinson's view of modesty in the public sphere.
He pays particular attention to the rationalization of usury in Protestant thought and to the motivation for capitalism rooted in the Puritan antinomian tradition which looked to economic effort and success as a sign of election.
that tantric Buddhism would bring antinomian behavior to Tibet were well founded (Samten Karmay, "The Ordinance of lHa Bla-ma Ye-Shes-'od," in The Arrow and the Spindle: Studies in the History, Myths, Rituals and Beliefs in Tibet [Kathmandu: Mandala Book Point, 1998], 3-16).
Pooley suggests that Bunyan "developed an antinomian theology of grace in the late 1650s and early 1660s for personal and pastoral reasons" (122), while distancing himself from the admittedly attractive moral antinomianism of the Ranters.
In Part 2, Bourg examines the role played by Deleuze and Guattari's Anti-Oedipus (1972) as exemplifying the antinomian liberationist moment of 1968, which while keeping the ethical dimension in check (even though Foucault referred to the book, as Bourg cites several times, as a 'work of ethics'), gives voice to one of the guiding motifs of May 68--'It is forbidden to forbid' ('Interdit d'interdire')--as it challenges institutional psychotherapy with an anti-authoritarian philosophy of desire.
These heightened forms of an originally North American fervor can return to their point of origin to be embraced anew by those who always eagerly await the latest finely honed mode of antinomian resentment.