antinomianism


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antinomianism

(ăntĭnō`mēənĭzəm) [Gr.,=against the law], the belief that Christians are not bound by the moral law, particularly that of the Old Testament. The idea was strong among the Gnostics, especially MarcionMarcion
, c.85–c.160, early Christian bishop, founder of the Marcionites, one of the first great Christian heresies to rival Catholic Christianity. He was born in Sinope. He taught in Asia Minor, then went (c.135) to Rome, where he perfected his theory.
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. Certain heretical sects in the Middle Ages practiced sexual license as an expression of Christian freedom. In the Protestant Reformation theoretical antinomian views were maintained by the Anabaptists and Johann Agricola, and in the 17th cent. Anne Hutchinson was persecuted for supposed antinomianism. Rom. 6 is the usual refutation for antinomianism.

antinomianism

the beliefs held, e.g. by the members of some Protestant sects in the 16th and 17th centuries, that, as members of ‘God's elect’, they could no longer be guilty of sin. As WEBER (1922) put it, such persons felt themselves ‘certain of salvation’, and ‘no longer bound by any conventional rule of conduct’. This belief was interpreted by some believers as permitting them to engage in unorthodox marital practices, including plural marriages, as well as in sexual activity outside marriage, which they justified as bringing others to salvation. Weber's view was that antinomianism is a generally occurring phenomenon, and that the more systematically the ‘practical psychological character’ of a religious faith develops, the greater is the tendency for antinomianism to be the outcome.
References in periodicals archive ?
This problem of satisfying conflicting wishes--for Auden, conflicting wishes must terminate in sin; for Jarrell, they inevitably assume new shapes and guises--presents a distinction of kind we can make between the two poets' use and appreciation of form, between Jarrell's antinomianism and Auden's skepticism.
And throughout, Frank maintained with his followers a secret, heretical religion of transgression, antinomianism, and inversion.
autonomy, antinomianism, rationalism and universalism.
The second volume contains 195 alphabetical entries on ideas, events, and issues, with a representative sampling of entry titles including antinomianism, angels, broadsides, Cambridge Agreement, law in puritan New England, New Model Army, theater and opposition, and witchcraft.
Antinomianism in early Stuart England has long been a controversial subject, and the almost uniformly hostile nature of the sources--it was a term of abuse, not self-identification--has led some recent historians to question its presence in the period.
On the one hand, Zongmi and Yanshou were keenly aware of the danger of antinomianism, and much of their reform agenda was not to abandon precepts altogether but in fact to establish them upon more affirmative ontological ground.
Marc Galanter, The Three-Legged Pig: Risk Redistribution and Antinomianism in American Legal Culture, 22 MISS.
Thus it was inevitable that his first--and perhaps greatest--novel, Der sotn in Goray (Satan in Goray), should be a critique of antinomianism.
Initially, the chapter traverses somewhat familiar terrain, focussing on Blake's response to industrialism, yet subsequent analysis of antinomianism during the last decade of the Eighteenth Century provides Blake "a grounding in proximate nature" (59).
Supporters of enlightened internationalism can look optimistically to the future precisely because the ICC represents the latest triumph for a world-view that discredits reactionary realist antinomianism.
assertion of the liberty of the heart, in the middle age, which I have termed a medieval Renaissance, was its antinomianism, its spirit of rebellion and revolt against the moral and religious ideas of the time.
Judge likes the communitarian values he associates with the '40s and dislikes the antinomianism he associates with the '60s.