personality disorder

(redirected from antisocial personality disorder)
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personality disorder

[‚pərs·ən′al·əd·ē dis‚ȯrd·ər]
(psychology)
Any of various disorders characterized by abnormal behavior rather than by neurotic, psychotic, or mental disturbances.
References in periodicals archive ?
Frontal brain dysfunction in alcoholism with and without antisocial personality disorder.
Schema modes and childhood abuse in borderline and antisocial personality disorders.
Behavioral under-control also has been hypothesized to underlie the observed associations among childhood CD, alcohol and other drug use disorders, and adult antisocial personality disorders.
Antisocial personality disorder differs from psychopathy, which indicates a more severe form of sociopathy.
In trying to elucidate the relationship between alcohol consumption and aggression, researchers have suggested that people with a psychiatric condition called antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) may be particularly susceptible to alcohol-related aggression.
org/diseases-conditions/personality-disorders/symptoms-causes/dxc-20247656) the Mayo Clinic attributes  to people with antisocial personality disorder.
Critics have argued both for and against the idea that antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy are synonymous, but there has yet to be a concrete decision on the issue.
Indeed, offenders with ADHD were more likely than their counterparts without it to have antisocial personality disorder (54% vs.
Preliminary data suggest that deceitful, violent men diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder have a reduced amount of gray matter in the brain's prefrontal cortex.
depression), anxiety disorders, and antisocial personality disorder.
This includes conditions such as anxiety disorders like spider phobia, social phobia, social anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, hair-picking, pathological gambling, schizophrenia, dementia, different forms of depression and personality disorders, such as antisocial personality disorder commonly known as psychopathy.
To assess this each participant was rated on "trait impulsivity" - a psychological measure of one's tendency to behave with little forethought or consideration of the consequences, and a predictor of higher risk of developing addictive disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, antisocial personality disorder and bipolar disorder.