apostolic succession

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Related to apostolicity: catholicity

apostolic succession,

in Christian theology, the doctrine asserting that the chosen successors of the apostles enjoyed through God's grace the same authority, power, and responsibility as was conferred upon the apostles by Jesus. Therefore present-day bishops, as the successors of previous bishops, going back to the apostles, have this power by virtue of this unbroken chain. For the Orthodox, Roman Catholic, and Anglican churches, this link with the apostles is what guarantees for them their authority in matters of faith, morals, and the valid administration of sacraments. Essential to maintaining the apostolic succession is the right consecration of bishops. Apostolic succession is to be distinguished from the Petrine supremacy (see papacypapacy
, office of the pope, head of the Roman Catholic Church. He is pope by reason of being bishop of Rome and thus, according to Roman Catholic belief, successor in the see of Rome (the Holy See) to its first bishop, St. Peter.
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). Protestants (other than Anglican) see the authority given to the apostles as unique, proper to them alone, and hence reject any doctrine of a succession of their power. The Protestant view of ecclesiastical authority differs accordingly. See orders, holyorders, holy
[Lat. ordo,=rank], in Christianity, the traditional degrees of the clergy, conferred by the Sacrament of Holy Order. The episcopacy, priesthood or presbyterate, and diaconate were in general use in Christian churches in the 2d cent.
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; churchchurch
[probably Gr.,=divine], aggregation of Christian believers. The traditional belief has the church the community of believers, living and dead, headed by Jesus, who founded it in the apostles. This is the doctrine of the mystical body of Christ (Eph. 1.22–23).
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.

succession, apostolic:

see apostolic successionapostolic succession,
in Christian theology, the doctrine asserting that the chosen successors of the apostles enjoyed through God's grace the same authority, power, and responsibility as was conferred upon the apostles by Jesus.
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.
References in periodicals archive ?
The book is to be commended as a helpful introductory framing of the discussion of apostolicity, especially for lay readers.
Continuity of Apostolicity through Apostolic Succession
71) See Jeffrey Gros, "Faith on the Frontier: Understandings of Apostolicity among American Born Churches," One m Christ, vol.
In this context it would be desirable to reflect on unity in close relation with holiness, catholicity and apostolicity and to develop comparative methodologies.
Because Catholics stress the visible, historical nature of the church, they have traditionally emphasized apostolicity in terms of succession in the historical episcopal office.
However I want to focus on a few that I think are particularly significant for his understanding of ministry and mission: (1) community and fellowship, (2) catholicity and unity, (3) apostolicity, (4) confession, (5) Word and sacrament, and (6) context.
In part, it is about ecumenism as an authentic mark of the church, along with holiness, unity, catholicity and apostolicity.
34) Viorel Ionita, therefore, points out, "that Baptism cannot be considered independently or cut off from its ecclesiological context, that means neither from the other sacraments nor from the apostolicity of the Church.
This continuity lies behind the Christian confession of the church's apostolicity.
34, is cited for its many-stranded description of apostolicity in the Church.
BEM's reorientation of apostolicity is an ecumenical gift that allows divided churches to recognize within one another, and to receive from one another, a much broader expression of apostolicity.
Locklin explores two issues common to Christians and Hindus: apostolicity and authority, and mission.