apparent brightness


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brightness

That attribute of visual perception in accordance with which a surface appears to emit more light or less light. Now called luminance.
References in periodicals archive ?
The image will have more color and contrast, so we should be able to see more detail--except that magnification also plays a role in apparent brightness.
Jupiter's belts and zones typically differ in apparent brightness by 10% to 20% percent, while the contrast of Saturn's belts and zones, muted by the presence of high-altitude atmospheric hazes, usually amount to only 5% to 15%.
Finally, a comparison with the apparent brightness as seen from Earth shows how far away it must be.
The relation of apparent brightness to contrast threshold on a photopic background: Dependence on retinal position and size.
Comparing this with the apparent brightness as seen from earth enables scientists to work out how far away it is.
It's something whose intrinsic brightness you know and by looking at its apparent brightness - because the intensity of light fades with the square of the distance - you can easily calculate the distance.
B] is the apparent brightness temperature distribution of all sources observed by the antenna over the full 4[Pi] steradians.
The anticipated antenna temperature in each ease can be obtained by introducing the apparent brightness temperature in Equation 1.
the eye is now the problem, imperiums of sight, one after another, glance, gaze or glare; do you remember the orange itself, some other orange, or paint curling light into a skin of apparent brightness, incidents of touch, not merely recollected or assumed but edged into the space between canvas and pigment
In the Magellanic Clouds, however, all the Cepheids are about the same distance from us, so that their apparent brightness reflects their real brightness, or luminosity.
His forest has an apparent brightness, as though some form of packaging were necessary to mute the anxiety and sense of vulnerability caused by our hopeless situation; but in psychosocial fact it is as dark as Dante's.
As the CFL experience has taught us, if certain minimum expectations in the quality, reliability, apparent brightness, and directivity of the light produced are not met, the products will be considered of poor quality which has the potential of slowing adoption by the market of this critical energy-saving technology.