apparent magnitude

(redirected from apparent magnitudes)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to apparent magnitudes: Visual magnitude, absolute magnitudes

apparent magnitude:

see magnitudemagnitude,
in astronomy, measure of the brightness of a star or other celestial object. The stars cataloged by Ptolemy (2d cent. A.D.), all visible with the unaided eye, were ranked on a brightness scale such that the brightest stars were of 1st magnitude and the dimmest stars
..... Click the link for more information.
.

apparent magnitude

See magnitude.

apparent magnitude

[ə′pa·rənt ′mag·nə‚tüd]
(astronomy)
An index of a star's brightness relative to that of the other stars; it does not take into account the difference in distance between the stars and is not an indication of the star's true luminosity.
References in periodicals archive ?
34, was used to estimate corresponding V-band apparent magnitudes (the small colour variation (3)--up to 0.
The brighter a star's apparent magnitude is, the lower its measurement number.
The sun is the brightest celestial object as seen from Earth, with an apparent magnitude of -26.
But spherical figures are different from the other figures in this respect: among figures indistinguishable from a given visible figure, spherical figures alone have their real angle magnitudes equal to the apparent magnitudes of the angles in the visible figure.
COMPUTE IT YOURSELF Here are the formulas to find any object's actual size, and the apparent magnitude of any star, at any distance.
Then he plotted the stars' apparent magnitudes against their colors.
Stock said that most of them "do not show a conspicuous concentration of stars, the presence of a cluster being indicated only by the presence of stars of similar spectral types and apparent magnitudes.
The color index is the difference between a star's apparent magnitudes at two wavelengths.
This indicated that stars of very different apparent magnitudes often lie at the same distance from us, and thus stars did not all have the same true brightness.
Up to now we've been dealing only with apparent magnitudes - how bright things look from Earth.
A large, dark asteroid and a small, highly reflective one might have identical apparent magnitudes, but their thermal properties will be quite different.
On the best nights I can see stars down to an apparent magnitude of 4.