appeal


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Related to appeal: Appeal Court, Appeal letter

appeal,

in law, hearing by a superior court to consider correcting or reversing the judgment of an inferior court, because of errors allegedly committed by the inferior court. The party appealing the decision is known as the appellant, the party who has won the case in the lower court as the appellee. The term is also sometimes used to describe the review by a court of the action of a government board or administrative officer. Appellate procedure is set by statute. There are two types of errors, of fact and of law. An error of fact is drawing a false inference from evidence presented at the trial. An error of law is an erroneous determination of the legal rules governing procedureprocedure,
in law, the rules that govern the obtaining of legal redress. This article deals only with civil procedure in Anglo-American law (for criminal procedure, see criminal law).
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, evidenceevidence,
in law, material submitted to a judge or a judicial body to resolve disputed questions of fact. The rules discussed in this article were developed in England for use in jury trials.
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, or the matters at issue between the parties. Ordinarily, only errors of law may be reviewed in appeal. In an appeal from an action tried in equityequity,
principles of justice originally developed by the English chancellor. In Anglo-American jurisprudence equitable principles and remedies are distinguished from the older system that the common law courts evolved.
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, however, the appellate court passes on the entire record, both as to facts and law. Should the appeals court conclude that no error was committed, it will affirm the decision of the lower court. If it finds that there was error, it may direct a retrial or grant a judgmentjudgment,
decision of a court of law respecting the issues before it. The term ordinarily is not applied to the decree (order) of courts of equity. The outstanding characteristic of a legal judgment, in contrast to an equitable decree, is its finality and fixity; thus, except
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 or decreedecree,
in law, decision of a suit in a court of equity. It is the counterpart in equity of the judgment in a court of law, although in those jurisdictions where law and equity have merged, judgment is sometimes used to include both.
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 in favor of the party who lost in the lower court. The determinations of appeals courts are usually printed, often with an opinion indicating the basis for the court's decisions. Such opinions are of great utility in guiding the inferior courts and are often cited as precedents in future cases. See also habeas corpushabeas corpus
[Lat.,=you should have the body], writ directed by a judge to some person who is detaining another, commanding him to bring the body of the person in his custody at a specified time to a specified place for a specified purpose.
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.

Appeal

 

(juridical), one of the forms of appealing judicial decisions that have not become res judicata in criminal and civil proceedings.

In the appeal procedure, the next higher court examines the merits of the decision of a lower court, reviewing anew the investigation of the evidence presented in the case and any new evidence that may be presented. After this, the higher court will either affirm the appealed decision or, having reversed it, will render a new decision. This distinguishes an appeal from a cassation, which means in bourgeois states that a higher court cannot render a new decision but can only cancel the appealed decision or direct the lower court to retry the case. In an appeal, a court’s decision is reviewed not merely in terms of isolated procedures but on the merit of the case as a whole—including the guilt or innocence of the defendant, the punitive measure, the recovery or dismissal, and the amount sought in the suit. The decision resulting from an appeal procedure is usually subject to a cassation appeal (with a few exceptions).

The appeal form developed in France during the period of the consolidation of absolutism, since an appeal made it possible to transfer a case from the courts of the local feudal lords to royal courts. In bourgeois states, as a rule, all judicial decisions can be appealed, aside from jury trials and such exceptions as court-martials. Only in Great Britain, by a law passed in 1907, are appeals of jury verdicts allowed. Moreover, in reviewing a case, the appellate court has the right to make worse the position of the parties—for example, by increasing the punitive measure. The introduction of appeals of decisions arising out of jury trials in Great Britain was a departure even from the bourgeois-democratic foundations of the judicial process, since the jury trial in bourgeois countries is the sole form of the general population’s participation in administration of justice. Under an appeal system, the center of proceedings is shifted to the appellate court. This essentially limits the importance of the courts of first instance, which are usually more accessible to the population from the point of view of publicity of the judicial proceedings.

In the USSR, the appeal procedure was abolished by the First Decree on the Courts of Nov. 22, 1917, since it was regarded as an institution that could not be conducive to the consolidation of the authority of the new people’s courts. In contemporary Soviet procedure there are only isolated elements of appeal procedure. For example, article 46 of the Fundamentals of Civil Procedure of the USSR and the Union Republics (1961) allows the next higher court to render a new decision if the case requires no gathering or additional checking of evidence and the circumstances of the case were fully and correctly established by the court of first instance but some error in applying the law has occurred. Such a formulation does not undermine the authority and importance of decisions rendered by lower courts, primarily by raion or city people’s courts—the basic units of the Soviet judicial system. The form of appealing court decisions in the USSR is that of cassation.

T. N. DOBROVOL’SKAIA.

appeal

1. Law
a. the judicial review by a superior court of the decision of a lower tribunal
b. a request for such review
c. the right to such review
2. Cricket a verbal request to the umpire from one or more members of the fielding side to declare a batsman out
3. English law (formerly) a formal charge or accusation
References in classic literature ?
That she should never trouble him--but never, never: neither appeal nor complain nor write about anything; only meet all questions herself, receive all moneys from his solicitor, take the whole thing over and let him alone.
She moved cautiously along the entry, paused one moment at her mistress' door, and raised her hands in mute appeal to Heaven, and then turned and glided into her own room.
Again, I sometimes say to myself, When many millions of men, without heat, without ill will, without personal feelings of any kind, demand of you a few shillings only, without the possibility, such is their constitution, of retracting or altering their present demand, and without the possibility, on your side, of appeal to any other millions, why expose yourself to this overwhelming brute force?
Of course, I thought they would appeal to me to keep mum, and then we would shake hands, and take a drink all round, and laugh it off, and there an end.
Yes, the Old Masters often drew badly; they did not care much for truth and exactness in minor details; but after all, in spite of bad drawing, bad perspective, bad proportions, and a choice of subjects which no longer appeal to people as strongly as they did three hundred years ago, there is a SOMETHING about their pictures which is divine--a something which is above and beyond the art of any epoch since--a something which would be the despair of artists but that they never hope or expect to attain it, and therefore do not worry about it.
THE main purpose of this story is to appeal to the reader's interest in a subject which has been the theme of some of the greatest writers, living and dead -- but which has never been, and can never be, exhausted, because it is a subject eternally interesting to all mankind.
I must be content to appeal to the wiser and therefore sadder reader, of whom I have but a poor opinion if he too fails to understand me.
When the Abyssins are engaged in a law-suit, the two parties make choice of a judge, and plead their own cause before him; and if they cannot agree in their choice, the governor of the place appoints them one, from whom there lies an appeal to the viceroy and to the Emperor himself.
And if there was a necessity for confiding the original cognizance of causes arising under those laws to them there would be a correspondent necessity for leaving the door of appeal as wide as possible.
It seemed as though the Priests had no choice between submission and extermination; when suddenly the course of events was completely changed by one of those picturesque incidents which Statesmen ought never to neglect, often to anticipate, and sometimes perhaps to originate, because of the absurdly disproportionate power with which they appeal to the sympathies of the populace.
In each case they appeal to the evidence of language.
The estuaries of rivers appeal strongly to an adventurous imagination.