appetitive behavior


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appetitive behavior

[ə′ped·ə·tiv bi′hāv·yər]
(zoology)
Any behavior that increases the probability that an animal will be able to satisfy a need; for example, a hungry animal will move around to find food.
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The BAS is activated by discriminative stimuli principally associated with positive and negative reinforcements both connected with positive and agreeable situations and events able to regulate appetitive behavior and fight or flight reactions.
These qualities are most likely responsible for the methodical and unrushed appetitive behavior of the cockroach.
The largest part of the book discusses dynamic treatment approaches to psychiatric disorders as described in the DSM-5, including schizophrenia, mood and anxiety disorders, disorders of sexual and appetitive behavior, neurodevelopmental and neurocognitive issues, and personality disorders.
We here hypothesize that in Lymnaea after the establishment of CTA with 50 or more pairings of the CS-US, the CS (sucrose) would elicit a fear response rather than an appetitive behavior (biting).
Savage also reported that a) normal and forebrainless fish showed similar speeds in feeding, even when the levels of food deprivation and appetitive behavior were comparable; b) the removal of the forebrain did not interfere with the ability to learn simple simultaneous spatial discrimination; and c) the introduction of a five second delay between response and reward caused the extinction of discrimination in the telencephalon ablated fish, but not, however, in the non operated fish.
Appetitive behavior can become problematic, particularly if carried out in excess or if harmful or maladaptive consequences are probable.
When consequences for bullying are static and predictable, proactive aggressors can be expected to calculate in advance at which times and places and with which people the rewards for their appetitive behavior will outweigh the potential consequences of getting caught (Woodworth & Porter, 2002).
Synergistic and Regulatory Effects of Orbitofrontal Cortex on Amygdala-Dependent Appetitive Behavior
Ventral tegmental area neurons in learned appetitive behavior and positive reinforcement.
Approach is an appetitive behavior whereas grab, mount, and cloacal contact are consummatory behaviors (Domjan, 1994).
There is some experimental evidence suggesting that exposure to inescapable shock reduces normal appetitive behavior, although this work examined nondeprived animals (Desan, Silbert, & Maier, 1988; Maier, Silbert, Woodmansee, & Desan, 1990).