appetitive behavior


Also found in: Medical.

appetitive behavior

[ə′ped·ə·tiv bi′hāv·yər]
(zoology)
Any behavior that increases the probability that an animal will be able to satisfy a need; for example, a hungry animal will move around to find food.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ventral tegmental area neurons in learned appetitive behavior and positive reinforcement.
Appetitive behavior can become problematic, particularly if carried out in excess or if harmful or maladaptive consequences are probable.
When consequences for bullying are static and predictable, proactive aggressors can be expected to calculate in advance at which times and places and with which people the rewards for their appetitive behavior will outweigh the potential consequences of getting caught (Woodworth & Porter, 2002).
Synergistic and Regulatory Effects of Orbitofrontal Cortex on Amygdala-Dependent Appetitive Behavior
Approach is an appetitive behavior whereas grab, mount, and cloacal contact are consummatory behaviors (Domjan, 1994).
There is some experimental evidence suggesting that exposure to inescapable shock reduces normal appetitive behavior, although this work examined nondeprived animals (Desan, Silbert, & Maier, 1988; Maier, Silbert, Woodmansee, & Desan, 1990).
1950) came to call appetitive behavior and consummatory acts.