appointment


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appointment

Property law nomination to an interest in property under a deed or will
References in classic literature ?
got to get the appointment confirmed--I reckon you'll grant that?
She writes me word that she mentioned my appointment, and repeated the warning I had given her to both the daughters.
The explanation that followed was unsatisfactory and the count asked Christine Daae for an appointment.
On the contrary, that same assembly which issued the Declaration of Independence, instead of continuing to act in the name and by the authority of the good people of the United States, had, immediately after the appointment of the committee to prepare the Declaration, appointed another committee, of one member from each colony, to prepare and digest the form of confederation to be entered into between the colonies.
In the coach there was, as afterwards appeared, a Biscay lady on her way to Seville, where her husband was about to take passage for the Indies with an appointment of high honour.
The COMMON COUNCIL had the appointment of all the judges and magistrates of the respective CITIES.
And according to one, this mode of appointment is extended to one of the co-ordinate branches of the legislature.
Then the idea seized him that he had read incorrectly, and that the appointment was for eleven o'clock.
Manicamp wishes for the appointment of a second maid of honor.
To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, the Militia, and for governing such Part of them as may be employed in the Service of the United States, reserving to the States respectively, the Appointment of the Officers, and the Authority of training the militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress;
But now in this government of Plato's there are no traces of a monarchy, only of an oligarchy and democracy; though he seems to choose that it should rather incline to an oligarchy, as is evident from the appointment of the magistrates; for to choose them by lot is common to both; but that a man of fortune must necessarily be a member of the assembly, or to elect the magistrates, or take part in the management of public affairs, while others are passed over, makes the state incline to an oligarchy; as does the endeavouring that the greater part of the rich may be in office, and that the rank of their appointments may correspond with their fortunes.
You know that I made an appointment with that little girl at the end of the Pont Saint- Michel, and I can only take her to the Falourdel's, the old crone of the bridge, and that I must pay for a chamber.