apposition

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Related to appositive: prepositional phrase

apposition

Biology growth in the thickness of a cell wall by the deposition of successive layers of material
References in periodicals archive ?
The problem with appositive structures, however, is that by choosing different parameters as criterial for apposition linguists have ended up classifying as appositive a large list of seemingly (and surely) different constructions (Meyer 1992; but see also Kortman 1994; Acuna 1999; Acuna 2000).
While the use of the given name alone makes Lily familiar to the reader in the way a maid may be said to be familiar to her employers, the use of the somewhat unexpected appositive definite description--"the caretaker's daughter"--calls attention to her lower class status.
The identical rhymes that break out in the final stanza (again, again, again, again) drive home the point of the child's importance as a symbol, an arbitrary and appositive sign that stands in for something, reproduces it, in contradistinction to any actual children, whose historical and personal specificity--not to mention gender as a girl or boy--might make identical rhyme tantamount to a form of reification.
At the same time, it embodies Wordsworth's ambivalence about these hauntings by its ambiguous reference to "the infirmity of love," where the preposition is indeterminately poised between its genitive and appositive meanings.
The fortress" becomes an appositive rather than the object of the verb "to break.
non-restrictive or appositive ones are accounted for by positing that restrictive operators move to [C.
James Irby's translation (published by New Directions) renders the title as "Funes the Memorius," which preserves both the odd Spanish word and the appositive relation.
Fay enacts such a naming of the world in marking out the territory of her six rhetorical tropes: appositive thinking and its variant, blindsiding, hystericization and conspiratorial thinking, conduct-book thinking, and literalization.
They typically begin with a clause or long phrase, followed by a short attribution, interjection or appositive.
Finally, Hawthorne's gender politics are inscribed in the syntax of transparent appositive or equation; just as Hester knows that she will be seen as "the figure, the body, the reality of sin" (p.