aragonite


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aragonite

[ə′räg·ə‚nīt]
(mineralogy)
CaCO3 A white, yellowish, or gray orthorhombic mineral species of calcium carbonate but with a crystal structure different from those of vaterite and calcite, the other two polymorphs of the same composition. Also known as Aragon spar.
References in periodicals archive ?
Today's levels of aragonite saturation in these locations have already dropped five times below the pre-industrial range of natural variability.
Nonskeletal aragonite and PCOZ in the Phanerozoic and Proterozoic.
They are formed through concentric additions of alternating protein and aragonite layers around a central nucleus.
Unfortunately, rejuvenation of the working edge of the Ilin shell adze has obliterated most of the potential use-wear traces, but the shell aragonite has a Mohs hardness of approximately 5, making it useful for numerous heavy-duty tasks including those identified for ground-stone adzes.
Calcium carbonate, in the form of aragonite, becomes increasingly harder for zooplankton, coral, and mollusks to produce for their shells, and the food web begins to further unravel.
If calcium carbonate is used as the standard, the relative bioavailability of Ca in limestone, aragonite, gypsum, marble dust, and oyster shell is between 93 and 102%, and in dolomitic limestone, the relative bioavailability is between 51 and 78% (Table 4; Ross et al.
Polyps produce a special kind of calcium carbonate called aragonite at extraordinarily high rates, and they fashion these aragonite crystals into the most incredible structures, true feats of architectural design.
Additional optional equipment includes the new full LED Intelligent Light System (PS1,280), new Aragonite Silver metallic paint (from October, priced at PS645) and new leather upholstery colours in Espresso Brown, Deep Sea Blue and Bengal Red.
Coral reefs use a mineral called aragonite to make their skeletons.