archaeoastronomy


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archaeoastronomy

(ar-kee-oh-ă-stron -ŏ-mee) The astronomy of early or nonliterate cultures, of interest to astronomers, archaeologists, and anthropologists. Many megalithic sites in the UK, Europe, and North and South America are thought to have been used for astronomical measurements and predictions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scholars of archaeoastronomy believe that this snail-like building was designed to facilitate viewing astronomical phenomena such as the rising of the Sun and the setting of Venus.
In the Australian Aboriginal context, archaeoastronomy and cultural astronomy were first reported by Stanbridge (1857), who wrote about the sky knowledge of the Boorong people (Hamacher and Frew 2010).
This is yet another question that still remains problematical, despite Rolf Krauss's recent commentary, "Astronomical Chronology," in In Search of Cosmic Order: Selected Essays on Egyptian Archaeoastronomy, ed.
But the book's most significant novelty is its emphasis on archaeoastronomy, the study of ancient cultures' astronomical knowledge.
In search of cosmic order; selected essays on Egyptian archaeoastronomy.
This book introduces the discipline of archaeoastronomy to students and scholars by reviewing ancient mythologies about the universe, revealing Babylonian concepts of astronomy, charting the development of calendars and documenting the Copernican and Newtonian Revolutions.
After several years of fieldwork, Ghezzi collaborated with archaeoastronomy expert Clive Ruggles from the University of Leicester In England.
Cruttenden draws upon archaeoastronomy, ancients texts, myths, and folklore, presenting his findings and theories enhanced with vivid graphics and scientific commentary that will engage the reader's attention from beginning to end.
Still, to his credit, he allows that shamanist and neuroscientific interpretations need not entirely exclude other interpretations, such as hunting magic and archaeoastronomy.
Guy Prouty an adjunct assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Oregon, Oregon State University, and Eastern Oregon University will give a presentation on archaeoastronomy at the regular membership meeting of the Eugene Astronomical Society at 7 p.
To test his theory, Cobo used archaeoastronomy to plot points from Catequilla where the solar alignments seemed similarly auspicious and suggested that archaeologists begin excavating to see what might be buried there.