archaeoastronomy


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archaeoastronomy

(ar-kee-oh-ă-stron -ŏ-mee) The astronomy of early or nonliterate cultures, of interest to astronomers, archaeologists, and anthropologists. Many megalithic sites in the UK, Europe, and North and South America are thought to have been used for astronomical measurements and predictions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, archaeoastronomy seems to have begun with work on the medicine wheels of Native Americans, done in the 1960s and '70s by John Eddy of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo.
Perhaps in the context of Mississippian civilisation it works, but the value of archaeoastronomy more generally is also questionable, and needs convincingly working through with other bodies of evidence.
Potemkina's discussion of astronomical reference points in Trans-Ural Eneolithic sanctuaries really needs a tutorial both about archaeoastronomy and about the Neolithic of western Europe (for Stonehenge she cites J.
Journal of Happiness Studies, Queueing Systems, Wear, World Pumps, with titles for archaeologists such as Anthropoetics, Archaeological Dialogues and Archaeoastronomy & Ethnoastronomy News), so that an author can publish almost any article by moving down the journal ranking far enough (Svetlov 2004).
Archaeoastronomy, the Journal of Astronomy in Culture XVI: 83-97.
Ferdon 1961; Lee & Liller 1987; Liller 1989), archaeologists of Polynesia have largely ignored or avoided the subject of archaeoastronomy, a somewhat surprising situation considering that there is an abundance of ethnohistoric and ethnographic data regarding indigenous Polynesian and Oceanic knowledge systems bearing on astronomy, calendrics and navigation (e.
Such is the work of David Peacock (1989; 1994) or the reports on trireme reenactments (Tilley 1992; Morrison 1991) or Etruscan archaeoastronomy (Aveni & Romano 1994).
Archaeology and astronomy: a view from Scotland, Archaeoastronomy 9.
Secrets of Ancient America: Archaeoastronomy and the Legacy of the Phoenicians, Celts, and Other Forgotten Explorers provides a new alternative history of America that gathers evidence of ancient explorers before Columbus, and shares some 25 years of the author's personal research and travel to archaeological sties around North America.
In July the Tenth Oxford Conference on Archaeoastronomy brought to Cape Town international scholars of the relationship between astronomy and culture.
Archaeoastronomy is the interdisciplinary study of ancient, prehistoric and traditional astronomy and its cultural context (Krupp 1994:ix).
Conklin, "The Information of Middle Horizon Quipus," in Ethnoastronomy and Archaeoastronomy in the American Tropics, eds.