archduke


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archduke

a chief duke, esp (since 1453) a prince of the Austrian imperial dynasty

Archduke

 

(Erzherzog), in Austria and later in Austria-Hungary, a title held by princes of the royal house of Hapsburg, officially conferred in 1453. It stems from a privilege extended to Austrian dukes in the 12th century, by which they were granted rights equal to those of electors, who were also called Erzkurfürsten.

References in periodicals archive ?
It was pointed out in high political circles that if the emperor is permitted to reign only a few years more everything may continue as usual and Archduke Francis Ferdinand's death will have little lasting material effect on the foreign or domestic affairs of the dual monarchy.
Several earlier nationalist attempts to kill Archduke Ferdinand earlier that same day had already failed.
One of the largest known diamonds from the legendary Golconda mines in India, where diamonds were discovered some 3,000 years ago, the Archduke Joseph is comparable in origins and magnitude to the Koh-i-Noor in the British Crown Jewels.
The Archduke Joseph Diamond created a sensation when Christie's Geneva offered it for sale the first time in November 1993, where it realized 9.
Those exhibitions were mainly about Teniers's paintings of the Archduke Leopold Wilhelm's art gallery in the 1650s.
Page 33: Peter Paul Rubens' Portrait of Archduke Ferdinand, Jacques Stella's King Candaules Shows Gyges His Wife Queen Nyssia, Domenico Gargiulo's Bathsheba at Her Bath.
Salvetti also suggests that a careful reading of the Ritratto yields evidence of Rosello's encouragement of his fellow Nicodemite travelers in Italy, thus rendering complex and even subversive what appears on the surface to be a rather uncomplicated encomium to the Archduke Cosimo of Tuscany.
University Distinguished Professor of English, Emeritus, at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill) presents The Summer the Archduke Died: On Wars and Warriors, an anthology of essays discussing the outbreak of World War I in Europe in 1914 and the events of subsequent years.
Then, the assassination of the Archduke Ferdinand triggered a war that engulfed a continent.
Best of all are Moore's trademark portentous juxtapositions: In one key scene two women get it on at the riotous premier of Igor Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring; later a super-orgy is intercut with the shooting of Archduke Ferdinand.
It is tempting to see the June 25, 2006 abduction of Gilad Shalit as in some ways a replay of the June 28, 1914 assassination of Archduke Ferdinand by Serbian terrorists: a seemingly minor incident magnified into a world-historic tragedy (WWI) through the logic of entangling alliances and the opportunism of ambitious world leaders.
Speaking of which, the real coup, setting-wise, is Leopold's castle, portrayed by the actual hunting lodge of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, whose assassination sparked World War I and the end of all of this.