Archosauria

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Related to archosaur: Lepidosaur

Archosauria

[‚är·kə′sȯr·ē·ə]
(vertebrate zoology)
A subclass of reptiles composed of five orders: Thecodontia, Saurischia, Ornithschia, Pterosauria, and Crocodilia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Expert Thomas Sakmar, of Rockefeller University, New York, said: "The archosaur may have had better night vision than was generally appreciated.
A significant number of lungfish dentitions are now known from the Cretaceous (Cenomanian) Woodbine Formation, primarily from one new locality, the Arlington Archosaur Site of northeast Tarrant County.
Archosaurs were among the dominant land animals during the Triassic period 250 million to 200 million years ago and include dinosaurs, crocodiles and their kin.
Now there are many more cases of herbivorous archosaurs.
It further implies that one-way airflow evolved in archosaurs earlier than once thought, and may explain why those animals came to dominance in the Early Triassic Period, after the extinction and when the recovering ecosystem was warm and dry, with oxygen levels perhaps as low as 12 percent of the air compared with 21 percent today.
That means one-way airflow may have arisen not among the early archosaurs about 250 million years ago, but as early as 270 million years ago among cold-blooded diapsids, which were the common, cold-blooded ancestors of the archosaurs and Lepidosauromorpha, a group of reptiles that today includes lizards, snakes and lizard-like creatures known as tuataras.
The breathing method is believed to have first appeared in ancient reptiles called archosaurs which dominated the Earth 251 million years ago.
Dinosaurs and crocodiles belong to a group of large reptiles known as archosaurs, which prowled the earth during the Mesozoic Era, some 256 million years ago, when man's nearest ancestors were primitive mammals no bigger or complex than the common shrew.
We also discuss flying & swimming archosaurs and other animals of that period as well as earlier and later periods.
Today the tree is divided into three main branches (note that the pterosaurs and crurotarsans are archosaurs but not dinosaurs).
In contrast to crocodile-line archosaurs, bird-like archosaurs (Ornithodira) are very rare in the Evangeline Member.