area bombing


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Related to area bombing: Strategic bombing

area bombing

[′er·ē·ə ‚bäm·iŋ]
(ordnance)
Dropping of bombs on a general locality rather than on a specific target or in a pattern.

area bombing

Dropping bombs over all parts of a target area with the intention of hitting many small targets within the area or of making the area untenable for the enemy.
References in periodicals archive ?
He shows that Sir Arthur Harris, head of Bomber Command, the RAF branch charged with conducting the air campaign against Germany, and the biggest proponent of area bombing, was a complex figure who did not share the belief in the value of precision bombing that Sir Charles Portal, his superior, and the Americans did.
The wartime erosion of social and moral restraints on the bombing of civilians was evidenced on all sides during the war; in particular, however, the area bombing of civilians in Germany and Japan by the Allied nations during the latter part of the war wrought, "a revolution in the morality of warfare" (Schaffer, 1985: 3).
He instead turned to area bombing because precision bombing didn't work: daytime precision bombing required good weather, clear visibility, and weak German defences.
Grayling takes a similar yet broader tack than Donald Bloxham's contribution in Firestorm by seeking to answer the question "Did the Allies commit a moral crime in their area bombing of German and Japanese cities?
To Harris this meant continuing his area bombing of industrial centers.
In his conclusion, Grayling asserts that he has proven that area bombing was neither necessary nor proportionate, that it was against the general moral standards of western civilization and the specific laws of war of the time, and that Allied airmen should have refused to carry out area bombing missions over Germany and Japan, specifically including the overall RAF campaign directed by Air Marshal Arthur Harris and the USAAF B-29 missions, including Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
If highly concentrated area bombing achieved a crescendo of mass slaughter and degradation over Germany in 1944, in 1945 the world leapt into another zone.
Area bombing simply seemed too risky: it might waste scarce resources, strengthen the resolve of the German people, provide ammunition for Nazi propagandists, and alienate the American public.
Harris then made the outrageous assertion that his Bomber Command aircrews, specialized as they were in nighttime area bombing, could not bomb accurately by daylight.
Hastings not only chronicles the efforts of Bomber Command throughout World War II but also delves into the ongoing debate about the usefulness and morality of area bombing.
The sage decision by Churchill to take Gibson to America also highlighted that Bomber Command was capable of precision attacks as opposed to just the bludgeoning at area bombing.