aristocrat


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aristocrat

1. a member of the aristocracy; a noble
2. a person who advocates aristocracy as a form of government
References in classic literature ?
The capitalist and aristocrat of England cannot feel that as we do, because they do not mingle with the class they degrade as we do.
Briggs's brother, a radical hatter and grocer, called his sister a purse-proud aristocrat, because she would not advance a part of her capital to stock his shop; and she would have done so most likely, but that their sister, a dissenting shoemaker's lady, at variance with the hatter and grocer, who went to another chapel, showed how their brother was on the verge of bankruptcy, and took possession of Briggs for a while.
His being such a perfect aristocrat, don't you know, and his future position in society, had an influence not with her, but with her mother.
Sabin smiled upon him contemptuously - the maddening, compelling smile of the born aristocrat.
Larry Donovan was a passenger conductor, one of those train-crew aristocrats who are always afraid that someone may ask them to put up a car-window, and who, if requested to perform such a menial service, silently point to the button that calls the porter.
By an accident wholly explainable, the viscount and chevalier, aristocrats by nature, came instantly into unison; they recognized each other at once as men belonging to the same sphere.
Dogs of aristocrats who despise me," thought he, "I'll crush you some day.
All of a sudden Mademoiselle Amelie Thirion, the leader of the aristocrats, began to speak in a low voice, and very earnestly, to her neighbor.
In order to confine the dignity of Hadji to gentlemen of patrician blood and possessions, the Emperor decreed that no man should make the pilgrimage save bloated aristocrats who were worth a hundred dollars in specie.
Perhaps it was the mention of aristocrats that reminded her of Richard Dalloway and Rachel, for she ran on with the same penful to describe her niece.
I exulted to have Thackeray attack the aristocrats, and expose their wicked pride and meanness, and I never noticed that he did not propose to do away with aristocracy, which is and must always be just what it has been, and which cannot be changed while it exists at all.
Slender though his figure was, his frame was splendidly knit, and he carried himself as one of the aristocrats of the world.