armature

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armature,

in art: see sculpturesculpture,
art of producing in three dimensions representations of natural or imagined forms. It includes sculpture in the round, which can be viewed from any direction, as well as incised relief, in which the lines are cut into a flat surface.
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Armature

 

a set of auxiliary, usually standard, mechanisms and components that are not basic parts of a machine, structure, or building but that ensure its proper functioning.

There are several types of armatures, including pipe fittings (for water, steam, gas, fuel, and various products processed in the chemical, food, and other industries). Depending on their function, pipe fittings are called shutoff fittings (faucets and slide valves); safety fittings (valves); control fittings (valves and pressure regulators); outlet fittings (air outlets and condensation outlets); emergency fittings (signal horns); and others.

The armatures used in electrical machine building are current-conducting and auxiliary parts securely attached to the rotor of an electrical machine. Armatures in electrical systems include panels, sockets, switches, plugs, and others. In electrical lines armatures are parts and devices for attaching insulators to supports (poles) and conductors to insulators. In lighting engineering, armatures are the parts of light fixtures designed to distribute the luminous flux, protect the eyes from bright light rays, deliver the electric current, reinforce the lamp, protect it from damage, and so forth. Furnace fittings (used in metallurgical furnaces) are metal parts that increase the strength of the furnace and cool its outer surfaces.

A. F. MOZHEIKO and G. IU. KARNAUKHOVA


Armature

 

the rotating part of an electric machine. The term “armature,” as opposed to “rotor,” is usually used for DC machines. An armature includes a magnetic core that consists of laminated sheets of electrical steel that are insulated from each other by varnish or paper. A winding is placed in slots on the core and is connected to the commutator bars.

armature

[′är·mə‚chər]
(architecture)
Framing or bars fashioned of structural ironwork and used to reinforce various features, for example, slender columns or hanging members.
(electromagnetism)
That part of an electric rotating machine that includes the main current-carrying winding in which the electromotive force produced by magnetic flux rotation is induced; it may be rotating or stationary.
The movable part of an electromagnetic device, such as the movable iron part of a relay, or the spring-mounted iron part of a vibrator or buzzer.

Armature

That part of an electric rotating machine which includes the main current-carrying winding. The armature winding is the winding in which the electromotive force (emf) produced by magnetic flux rotation is induced. In electric motors this emf is known as the counterelectromotive force.

On machines with commutators, the armature is normally the rotating member. On most ac machines, the armature is the stationary member and is called the stator. The core of the armature is generally constructed of steel or soft iron to provide a good magnetic path, and is usually laminated to reduce eddy currents. The armature windings are placed in slots on the surface of the core. On machines with commutators, the armature winding is connected to the commutator bars. On ac machines with stationary armatures, the armature winding is connected directly to the line. See Core loss, Windings in electric machinery

armature

1. The heavy-current winding of a motor or generator.
2. The winding in a solenoid or relay.
3. Structural ironwork in the form of framing or bars (commonly employed in medieval buildings) used to reinforce slender columns, or to consolidate canopies or hanging members such as bosses, and in tracery.

armature

1. a revolving structure in an electric motor or generator, wound with the coils that carry the current
2. any part of an electric machine or device that moves under the influence of a magnetic field or within which an electromotive force is induced
3. a soft iron or steel bar placed across the poles of a permanent magnet to close the magnetic circuit
4. such a bar placed across the poles of an electromagnet to transmit mechanical force
5. Sculpture a framework to support the clay or other material used in modelling
6. the protective outer covering of an animal or plant
References in periodicals archive ?
I wanted you, the viewer, to make this sort of telescoping shift from one piece to the other--becoming their armature, in a way.
In previous lessons, simple armatures were applied inside a sculpture, but students had never applied armatures (buttresses) on the outside of a sculpture for support.
Have students attach the copper pieces to the wire armatures by folding over the edges onto the armature or by tying them on with wire.
In order to provide top performance in a wide variety of fuels, Johnson Electric has developed both flat and barrel versions of this commutator with a variety of graphite grades and configurations for its armatures.
The ultrastructure of pharyngeal armature was investigated in the larval Drosophila melanogaster, which principally feeds on yeasts and bacteria.
The velocity generated by the system is limited by rail strength and armature materials and their response to the high currents and extreme pressures generated during launch.
Day 5: Students bring in found materials for armatures and make final decisions on the designs for their sculptures.
Although her work has been compared to the complicated wooden armatures wrought by Sarah Sze, Moore's small assemblages are far more literal in their organization of chaos.
Yet despite initial misgivings, Ammann quickly rallied to the notion of exposed steel and the armatures of the twin towers are powerful and dignified expressions of engineering design.
PAS also supports a variety of input devices, including gloves and body-sensing armatures, and includes networking capabilities.
Tool life is greatly extended with replaceable armatures and externally accessible carbon brushes.