arm

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arm,

upper limb in humans. Three long bones form the framework of the arm: the humerus of the upper arm, and the radius (outer bone) and ulna (inner bone) of the forearm. The radius and ulna run parallel but meet at their ends in such a manner that the radius can rotate around the ulna. This arrangement permits turning the forearm to bring the hand palm up (supination) or palm down (pronation). The radius and ulna hinge with the bones of the hand at the wrist, and with the humerus at the elbow. The bicepsbiceps
, any muscle having two heads, or fixed ends of attachment, notably the biceps brachii at the front of the upper arm and the biceps femoris in the thigh. Originating in the shoulder area, the heads of the biceps merge partway down the arm to form a rounded mass of tissue
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 brachii, a muscle of the upper arm, bends the arm at the elbow; the tricepstriceps,
any muscle having three heads, or points of attachment, but especially the triceps brachii at the back of the upper arm. One head originates on the shoulder blade and two on the upper-arm bone, or humerus.
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 brachii straightens the arm. Movement of the arm across the chest and above the head is accomplished by the pectoral muscles of the chest and deltoid muscles of the shoulder, respectively. In an adult the arm is normally five sixths as long as the leg.

Arm

 

the upper extremity in man consisting of the shoulder, forearm, and hand (carpus, metacarpus, and phalanges of the fingers). The arm is a more developed grasping extremity in man than in man’s ancient ancestors, the Anthropomorphidae.

The transformation from Anthropomorphidae to man was largely promoted by freeing the anterior extremities, or arms, from locomotion and body-support functions and converting them into organs capable of performing work operations. As the arm became adapted to work, its structure substantially changed, becoming sharply distinct from the structure of the anterior extremity of Anthropomorphidae.

The most significant structural changes occurred in the hand. In Anthropomorphidae the hand has an underdeveloped thumb and the remaining fingers are greatly elongated; in contrast, the human hand is characterized by a powerfully developed thumb that is essential in performing all work operations. The remaining fingers of the human hand are significantly shorter than those of Anthropoidea but are nevertheless capable of the most delicate and differentiated movements.

In man’s development, the development of the arm as a work organ occurred simultaneously with the progressive development of the brain.

The body processes in brachiopods, the tentacles in cephalopods, and the mobile or nonmobile rays of echinoderms are sometimes called arms.

arm

[ärm]
(anatomy)
The upper or superior limb in humans which comprises the upper arm with one bone and the forearm with two bones.
(control systems)
A robot component consiting of an interconnected set of links and powered joints that move and support the wrist socket and end effector.
(electricity)
(engineering acoustics)
(geology)
A ridge or a spur that extends from a mountain.
(mathematics)
A side of an angle.
(naval architecture)
The part of an anchor extending from the crown to one of the flukes.
(oceanography)
A long, narrow inlet of water extending from another body of water.
(ordnance)
A combat branch of a military force; specifically, a branch of the U.S. Army, such as the Infantry Armored Cavalry, the primary function of which is combat.
(Often plural) Weapons for use in war.
To supply with arms.
To ready ammunition for detonation, as by removal of safety devices or alignment of the explosive elements in the explosive train of the fuse.
(physics)
The perpendicular distance from the line along which a force is applied to a reference point.

ARM

(processor)
Advanced RISC Machine.

Originally Acorn RISC Machine.

ARM

(company)
Advanced RISC Machines Ltd.

ARM

(publication)
["The Annotated C++ Reference Manual", Margaret A. Ellis and Bjarne Stroustrup, Addison-Wesley, 1990].

ARM

(hardware)
References in periodicals archive ?
And these days, he's whipping up home-made goodies for over the counter and for the cafe, including preserves, chutneys, quiches and cakes and serving all day breakfasts and lunch specials, like salmon with pasta salad and pot roast pork with potch - that mix of roots, leek and potato mashed together that was once a signature vegetable dish at the Armless Dragon.
Use-anywhere practicality and great looks mark these low armless lounge chairs
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For library and student lounge furniture, Bretford has released the Plus Tablet Arm Chair, available also in armless models, with either left- or right-hand tables, and a variety of fabric choices.
This armless musician and singer is too busy touring the nation to focus on his disability.
After his valet, Irvin McDuffie, helped him with the laborious task of putting on his iron leg braces and trousers, McDuffie lifted him into his armless wooden wheelchair for the elevator ride downstairs.
Tom wakes up one night with a start; he has heard a noise and immediately suspects a legless and armless monster is scraping around his home.
In ``Turtles Can Fly,'' the latest masterpiece from Iranian Kurd Bahman Ghobadi (``Marooned in Iraq,'' ``A Time for Drunken Horses''), it's the sight of an armless adolescent inching along the ground, carefully but expertly digging up a land mine with his mouth.
Hoffman Soto, David Greenaway, and Lakshmi Aysola, shrouded in white medical gowns and seated on roiling armless chairs, enacted their own terrifying death.
I thought of the blinded, armless, legless soldier in Dalton Trumbo's novel Johnny Got His Gun, who, lying on his hospital cot, unable to speak or hear, remembers when his hometown gave him a send-off, with speeches about fighting for liberty and democracy.