Inhibitor

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inhibitor

[in′hib·əd·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A substance bonded, taped, or dip-dried onto a solid propellant to restrict the burning surface and to give direction to the burning process.
(chemistry)
A substance which is capable of stopping or retarding a chemical reaction; to be technically useful, it must be effective in low concentration.

Inhibitor

 

a circuit having m + n inputs and a single output, at which a signal can appear only when there are no signals on the m inputs (inhibiting). The other n inputs (principal) form one of the two logic connections, “AND” or “OR.” Inhibitors are used extensively in computers. They are very often understood to be a circuit having a single principal input and a single inhibiting input. A signal appears at the output of such a circuit when a signal is present on the principal input but there is none on the inhibiting input. Such an inhibitor is called an anticoincidence gate; its conventional representation is given in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Block diagram of an anticoincidence gate (inhibitor) with m — 1 and n 1:(A) principal input, (Q) inhibiting input, (Ga) anticoincidence gate

inhibitor

A substance added to paint to retard drying, skinning, mildew growth, etc. Also see corrosion inhibitor, inhibiting pigment, drying inhibitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
In conclusion, the dramatic increase observed in aromatase gene expression and in those of other steroidogenic enzyme genes in 2-week pig testes coincide with the temporal production of large amounts of 19-nortestosterone in the 2-4 week testis, which suggests that aromatase is responsible for 19-nortestosterone biosynthesis.
Aromatase is stimulated both by FSH action on granulosa cells and by thecal androgens, the substrates for aromatase (Daniel and Armstrong 1980; Hillier and De Zwart 1981).
If aromatase is differentially expressed in dense and non-dense breast tissue, this could provide one mechanism by which density may increase breast cancer risk," Dr.
This could have been caused by aromatase inhibition because the aromatase is expressed in the uterus (36), and inhibition would thus lead to a reduced intracrine estradiol synthesis that subsequently must be "subtracted" from the estrogenic response induced by the administered potent estrogens (31,32).
Given the recent evidence that plasma estradiol and estrone levels are increased in atrazine-treated male Wistar rats (33), it is apparent that the presence of ovarian aromatase is not essential for the effects of atrazine.