aromatic amino acid


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aromatic amino acid

[¦ar·ə¦mad·ik ə′mēn·ō ′as·əd]
(biochemistry)
An organic acid containing at least one amino group and one or more aromatic groups; for example, phenylalanine, one of the essential amino acids.
References in periodicals archive ?
The formation of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase in bacteria was studied with intact cells in a reaction mixture containing the aromatic amino acid.
This enzyme, when present, allows the soybean to bypass glyphosate-inhibited native EPSP synthase in the shikimate pathway, thus preventing aromatic amino acids starvation and deregulation of this metabolic route, both of which follow glyphosate treatment in susceptible plants.
Rapid and precise measurement of serum branched-chain and aromatic amino acids by isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry" PLoS ONE, vol.
It is responsible for biosynthesis of all the aromatic amino acids tryptophan, phenylalanine and tyrosine found in nature via the shkimate pathway (1,2).
Flavourzyme, papain and Alcalase produced hydrolysates that contained the highest levels of aromatic amino acids, while trypsin hydrolysate had the highest levels of lysine and arginine.
Protein restriction and the use of oral or enteral formulas enriched in branched chain amino acids but low in aromatic amino acids are frequently the MNTs chosen in ESLD, however, they are not the most current or effective clinical practice (Krentisky, 2003; Mizock, 1999).
EZ:faast LC/MS kits from Phenomenex have been developed for the analysis of more than 60 aliphatic and aromatic amino acids, dipeptides and related compounds in just under 20 minutes.
In fishes, three main classes of such compounds have been found: aromatic amino acids of proteins, such as tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine; mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs); and derivatives of tryptophan such as kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine (2, 3).
The essential amino acids (lysine, leucine and isoleucine; sulfur-containing amino acids cystine and methionine; aromatic amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine; threonine, tryptophan and valine) must be ingested in sufficient quantity in foods or supplements; the human digestive system can make the remaining amino acids from food or precursors.
Wyse and Komor (1984) recognized three distinct amino-acid carrier systems in sugar-cane suspension cells for neutral amino acids, aromatic amino acids, and amides.
Inherited disorders affecting dopamine and serotonin: critical neurotransmitters derived from aromatic amino acids.