arpeggio

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arpeggio

1. a chord whose notes are played in rapid succession rather than simultaneously
2. an ascending and descending figuration used in practising the piano, voice, etc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The arpeggio passages, being in 6/8, are introduced by six eighth-note taps.
Weatherford's words echo - arpeggio, adagio, the crescendo collecting its strength to lift the heavy curtain of segregation - and with her final stroke the plain phrase Easter morning provides a benediction of life and glory.
5 by Mauro Giuliani, modified for tremolo, plus two other etudes featuring arpeggios and multiple scales, exercises, and chromatic patterns.
Beginning with five-finger positions and intervals, this book progresses to chords, scales, arpeggios and clusters before concluding with double-note trills and large-span rolled chords.
For those who dislike Glass' work, it usually involves his use of repeated notes and arpeggios.
Mendelssohn was an obvious influence here, the lyricism of cellist Richard Lester and violinist Anthony Marwood, being supported by seamless, flowing piano arpeggios.
Stanley Cavell is among the very few philosophers in America to have achieved a major reputation primarily through writing on the arts, and perhaps the only one to have evolved a prose style that has something of the character of artistic expression in its own right, however exasperating it is at times to read, and however difficult it often is to extract from its involutions, its switchbacks, its arpeggios, sudden riffs, and hip-hop cadences, a thesis one can walk away with and make one's own.
With its rippling arpeggios alternating between D minor and E-flat minor, "Swamp Creature," vividly evokes the swirling murkiness of a swamp.
Here, Jean Louis Steuerman made majestic use of the concert grand's dynamic extremities, one minute playfully teasing pianissimo arpeggios then powerfully grappling with forte cascading octaves the next.
However, on the marvelous ``Since I've Been Loving You,'' Page pulls off some beautiful arpeggios.
Grouping Fingers and Keys: A Visual Approach to Fingering Scales and Arpeggios, by Rosalie Gregory.
Combining the murmured vocals and skipping arpeggios of early REM with the kind of frantic finales favoured by Sonic Youth, these were two songs of many which made Roddy Woomble and his companions sound like a less weary version of Subaqwa.