arsenate


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Related to arsenate: Calcium arsenate, lead arsenate, sodium arsenate

arsenate

[′ärs·ən‚āt]
(inorganic chemistry)
AsO43-A negative ion derived from orthoarsenic acid, H3 AsO4·½H2O.
A salt or ester of arsenic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
coli that are sensitive to arsenate and others, like those from the arsenic-rich environment, which are tolerant of the chemical.
The exchangeability of sulfate and nitrate with arsenate HA/FA complexes was determined by placing equal portions of HA and FA suspensions into stopper bottles.
The gross clinical condition of mice was unaffected by ingestion of any of the amended diets; amendment of diet with soil or sodium arsenate did not significantly affect cumulative diet consumption (data not shown).
Before they were playgrounds, many of those schoolyards were orchards and Redfield-Wilder said the lead arsenate once used for pesticides are especially harmful to children--which is why they have since been cleaned.
But it is no longer considered acceptable in terms of the high As solubility and the environmental instability of the produced calcium arsenite or arsenate sludge.
bituminous coals studied, although arsenate and arsenic associated with organic matter were also found.
2004) investigated the co-sorption of arsenate and Zn(II) at the goethite-water interface at pH 4 and 7 with EXAFS spectroscopy.
The phasing out of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) in wood preservation will continue to benefit monoethanolamine as the two leading alternatives both make extensive use of the chemical.
This collection of 26 papers cover environmental impacts, assessment and management of human health risks, and end-of-life management and impacts with such topics as the impact of chromated copper arsenate, production and management in Europe, Asia and Oceania, study designs for environmental impacts, leaching of chemicals and the impact on the soil, modeling for leaching of inorganic components, effects on soil and water, the cost of human exposure to chromated copper arsentate, methods of evaluating contamination, risks to children, identification and disposal of treated woods, biomediation through bacteria and other removal techniques, and disposal in landfills.
Treated Wood in Transition: Less Toxic Options in Preserved and Protected Wood" surveys the regulatory, legal and business aspects of what has happened in the treated wood market since chromated copper arsenate (CCA) was taken off the market in early 2004.
However, the extensive use of lead arsenate in insect control has raised questions regarding the toxicity of these elements to plants and to animals feeding on sprayed or dusted plants.