arsenide


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Related to arsenide: arsenic, gallium arsenide

arsenide

[′ärs·ən‚īd]
(chemistry)
A binary compound of negative, trivalent arsenic; for example, H3 As or GaAs.
References in periodicals archive ?
The long-term potential for this thing is being able to bring the computing power of silicon and the communications capability of gallium arsenide together.
TriQuint Semiconductor designs and manufactures a wide range of high- and low-frequency products across all common high- and low-power ratings using gallium arsenide, surface acoustic wave (SAW) and bulk acoustic wave (BAW) processes for many different communications applications including military, commercial network infrastructure, sat-com, wireless (cellular) base stations and fiber optic networks.
Ramdani began wondering whether the STO would serve the same function for gallium arsenide.
Microelectronics makers will find it easier to craft new devices by knowing the true arrangement of atoms on the gallium arsenide surface, researchers say.
In one such effort, Ralph Jimenez and his coworkers at the University of California, San Diego are using X-ray diffraction techniques to measure changes in the spacing of atoms in laser-blasted gallium arsenide.
Products are based on advanced process technologies including gallium arsenide, silicon germanium, surface acoustic wave (SAW), and bulk acoustic wave (BAW).
Although silicon is by far the most widely used semiconductor today, gallium arsenide has advantages in certain applications.
Called a microcavity resonator, the device consists of a ring or disk made from layered gallium arsenide and aluminum gallium arsenide.
Spire Corporation (Nasdaq: SPIR) is developing nano-engineered gallium arsenide layers for fabrication of miniature terahertz lasers under an AFOSR-funded, $99,000 Phase I Small Business Technology Transfer Research (STTR) project.
The device constructed by the group consists of an extremely thin film of indium gallium arsenide, 10 nanometers across, sandwiched between layers of gallium arsenide.
To make gallium arsenide semiconductor wires, the researchers fill the glass capillaries with a liquid gallium compound.